Navigation Links
Bigger lungs may be better for transplants
Date:7/31/2013

When it comes to lung transplants, bigger may be better. That's the main finding from a University of Iowa study, which found that oversized lungs lead to improved survival following lung transplants, particularly among patients receiving double-lung transplants.

Currently, in the United States height is used as a surrogate for lung size for transplant candidates. But Michael Eberlein, clinical assistant professor in internal medicine at the UI, and colleagues came up with a new formula, called "predicted total lung capacity ratio," to find out which size lungs matched best with patients who are candidates for transplants.

"An unresolved question in the field of lung transplantation is how the size of the donor lungs relative to the recipient affects transplant success," he explains. "It is commonly believed that transplanting oversized lungs is problematic, but no data were available to substantiate that idea."

The pTLC ratio is calculated using height and gender. Taller people have bigger lungs and a man's lungs are larger than a woman's of the same height. The pTLC-ratio is determined by dividing the donor's pTLC by the patient's pTLC. A ratio of 1.0 is a perfect size match, whereas for example a ratio of 1.3 indicates that the donor lung is significantly larger than the patient's lung.

Eberlein and colleagues used data from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) lung transplant registry for all adult patients (aged 18 years and older) who underwent first-time lung transplantation between May 2005 and April 2010. Of the 6,997 patients included in the study, 4,520 underwent bilateral lung transplant and 2,477 underwent single lung transplant.

For patients undergoing a double-lung transplant, the team found that each 0.1 increase in the predicted total lung capacity (pTLC) ratio was associated with a 7 percent decrease in risk of death a year after the procedure. This decrease was still independently associated with improved survival following additional adjustment to account for any bias to oversizing. For those receiving one lung, each 0.1 increase in pTLC-ratio was associated with a 6 percent decrease in the risk of death a year later; however, this association was not present following the same additional adjustment to account for any bias to oversizing.

"This study shows that lung size matters in lung-transplant procedures," says Eberlein, lead author of the study published Aug. 1 in the journal The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. "We found that oversized allografts, up to a point, were associated with improved survival after lung transplantation. We would hope that recipients, within surgically feasible limits, could be listed for higher donor height ranges and ultimately have a better chance of receiving an acceptable donor lung."

In an editorial in the same issue of The Annals, Seth Force, from Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, praised the work. "The real strength of this study may be in showing that utilizing pTLC allows for a more standardized way of matching donor lungs compared to the height method," Force says. "The data in this manuscript make a compelling argument for the lung transplant community, as well as UNOS, to consider changing to a pTLC method for lung sizing for listed patients."


'/>"/>

Contact: Richard Lewis
richard-c-lewis@uiowa.edu
319-384-0012
University of Iowa
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Bigger birth weight babies at greater risk of autism
2. Bigger creatures live longer, travel farther for a reason
3. For mitochondria, bigger may not be better
4. Want bigger plants? Get to the root of the matter
5. Bigger refuges needed to delay pest resistance to biotech corn
6. Bigger gorillas better at attracting mates and raising young
7. Cigarette smoke impacts genes linked to health of heart and lungs
8. Lungs of the planet reveal their true sensitivity to global warming
9. Bioengineer studying how to send drugs to lungs through nanotechnology
10. Androforte for Low T is Better Absorbed and More Economical than Androgel or Testim!
11. New technologies and ingredients provide better options for gluten-free eating
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/3/2019)... ... October 02, 2019 , ... Personalized Stem Cells, Inc (“PSC”), a ... FDA approved clinical trial for stem cell treatment of knee osteoarthritis . The successful ... as a subsidiary of VetStem Biopharma. , PSC CEO, Michael Dale, stated, “We are ...
(Date:9/30/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... September 30, 2019 , ... As human ... an accepted model for studying the development and diseases of the human heart, there ... activities of the progeny heart muscle cells to be clearly and easily recorded. A ...
(Date:9/25/2019)... ... 2019 , ... Modality Solutions, a biopharmaceutical cold ... Magazine’s annual Inc. 5000 list, the most prestigious ranking of the nation’s fastest-growing ... this growth, the Houston-based firm also ranked No. 47 in its industry category ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:9/24/2019)... ... September 24, 2019 , ... Drug resistance has been declared as ... Organization, with MRSA becoming one of the most serious concerns. Hong Kong cannot be ... of community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA), or a seven-fold of the figure in 2007 – the ...
(Date:9/24/2019)... S.D. (PRWEB) , ... September 24, 2019 , ... In ... funding for research led by faculty at South Dakota School of Mines & ... the tiny microbes that attach to surfaces to form a slimy and yet strong ...
(Date:9/17/2019)... ... September 17, 2019 , ... Geneticure, Inc., a ... announces today that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) and European Patent ... drug class recommendations for hypertension treatment. , The patent applies to Geneticure’s ...
(Date:9/17/2019)... ... September 16, 2019 , ... ... with the China Focus @ Biotech Week Boston, a forum organized by MyBioGate, ... in healthcare innovation. , After a careful process of evaluation, twelve companies out ...
Breaking Biology Technology: