Navigation Links
Better protection for biomedial devices could result from Rutgers-Camden research
Date:12/6/2007

CAMDEN Biomedical and microelectronic devices could be better protected thanks to research underway at Rutgers UniversityCamden that aims to improve the coating of polymers in smoothness and uniformity, no matter how intricate the product.

Daniel Bubb, an associate professor of physics at Rutgers-Camden, has identified the conditions that ensure thorough polymer coating through a matrix-assisted laser process. Polymers are materials made from long chains of molecules and are used in a variety of industries often as a protective coating from contact lenses to battleships.

A $298,785, three-year National Science Foundation (NSF) grant is allowing Bubb and his team (including a post-doctoral fellow and undergraduate biology students) to continue pinpointing what solvents best interact with polymers for precise coating, and compiling new data on the effects of wavelengths on specific properties.

Bubb and his team employ a patented pulsed laser deposition technique, where a high-power infrared laser is focused onto a target material in a vacuum chamber, creating a plume of vaporized material. The object that is to be coated is placed in the path of the vapor and the laser is then tuned to a specific vibrational mode of the polymer. The Rutgers-Camden physics team has improved this process by tailoring specially blended solvents to particular polymers prior to the vaporization process and implementing an infrared laser on tested wavelengths that either completely remove or significantly limit any photochemical or photothermal damage.

Our work emphasizes the role of the polymer solvent interactions. If we start to precipitate the polymer with the solvent and it gets cloudy, it means the polymer isnt well separated. That means clusters would appear in the coating as unfavorable bumps, says the Rutgers-Camden researcher. In industry, these unfavorable bumps could result in damage to the device being coated, be it a hearing aid or semiconductor.

Bubbs research has far-ranging applications, including providing sterile coatings for intricate biomedical devices, like pacemakers or artificial joint replacements, and making multilayered structures, like television, cell phone, or laptop displays lighter and less reliant on voltage.

The primary advantage of organic electronics, like polymer LEDs used in a variety of displays, is the lower power consumption and reduced environmental impact. Lower power consumption means the devices can be more compact and portable. Its pretty clear with the advent of the iPhone that consumers want lots of features and capabilities in a small footprint, remarks Bubb. In addition to being less transportable, computers made from conventional semiconductor electronics contain harsh metals, like lead or mercury, and are difficult to recycle.

The reduced power consumption will have a positive impact on our use of energy resources both renewable and nonrenewable, Bubb adds.


'/>"/>

Contact: Cathy Donovan
catkarm@camden.rutgers.edu
856-225-6627
Rutgers University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. New caledonian crows find 2 tools better than 1
2. Restoring sight, advances in fertility treatments and better visibility for pilots at FIO
3. New CPR promises better results by compressing abdomen, not Chest
4. City birds better than rural species in coping with human disruption
5. Doctors learn to control their own brains pain responses to better treat patients
6. Study reveals that immigrant teenagers eat better than Spanish teenagers
7. New membrane strips carbon dioxide from natural gas faster and better
8. New approach builds better proteins inside a computer
9. People who skip meals: are they better off?
10. Researchers successfully simulate photosynthesis and design a better leaf
11. Human safety, prosperity depend on better ocean observing system: Scientists
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/1/2016)... -- Favorable Government Initiatives Coupled With Implementation ... to Boost Global Biometrics System Market Through 2021  ... " Global Biometrics Market By Type, By End ... - 2021", the global biometrics market is projected to ... growing security concerns across various end use sectors such ...
(Date:5/9/2016)... 2016 Elevay is currently known ... freedom for high net worth professionals seeking travel for ... connected world, there is still no substitute for a ... sealing your deal with a firm handshake. This is ... advantage of citizenship via investment programs like those offered ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... , April 27, 2016 ... the  "Global Multi-modal Biometrics Market 2016-2020"  report to ... ) , The analysts forecast the ... CAGR of 15.49% during the period 2016-2020.  ... number of sectors such as the healthcare, BFSI, ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... BEACH, Calif. , June 23, 2016  Blueprint ... new biological discoveries to the medical community, has closed ... co-founder Matthew Nunez . "We have ... us with the capital we need to meet our ... will essentially provide us the runway to complete validation ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... ClinCapture, the only free validated ... will showcase its product’s latest features from June 26 to June 30, 2016 ... on Disrupting Clinical Trials in The Cloud during the conference. DIA (Drug ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 22, 2016  Amgen (NASDAQ: AMGN ) ... QB3@953 life sciences incubator to accelerate the development ... laboratory space at QB3@953 was created to help high-potential ... for many early stage organizations - access to laboratory ... Amgen launched two "Amgen Golden Ticket" awards, providing each ...
(Date:6/22/2016)... June 22, 2016 Research and Markets has ... report to their offering. ... 2014 from $29.3 billion in 2013. The market is expected to ... from 2015 to 2020, increasing from $50.6 billion in 2015 to ... forecasts during the forecast period (2015 to 2020) are discussed. As ...
Breaking Biology Technology: