Navigation Links
Bee disease a mystery
Date:6/29/2008

Scientists are one step closer to understanding the recent demise of billions of honey bees after making an important discovery about the transmission of a common bee virus. Deformed wing virus (DWV) is passed between adult bees and to their developing brood by a parasitic mite called Varroa destructor when it feeds. However, research published in the July issue of the Journal of General Virology suggests that the virus does not replicate in Varroa, highlighting the need for further investigation.

Deformed wing virus has been linked to the collapse of honey bee colonies in Britain. In recent years the prevalence of the virus has increased globally in colonies infested with Varroa. It is widely accepted that the virus replicates in the mite and is then transmitted to bees when it bites. However, researchers at Rothamsted Research and the University of Nottingham have found that the virus does not replicate in the mite, suggesting an alternative means of transmission.

"Experiments and field observations have shown that V. destructor is able to transmit several different unrelated honey bee viruses, like acute bee paralysis virus and Kashmir bee virus as well as deformed wing virus," said Professor Teresa Santillan-Galicia from Rothamsted Research. "But we still don't know exactly how these viruses are passed from the mite to the bee."

The researchers wanted to find out whether the virus replicates in the mite and if so where this occurs, to understand how the virus is transmitted. They used a process called immunohistochemistry which involves using antibodies which bind to specific surface proteins, enabling the virus particles to be located. There was no evidence of virus replication within the cells of the mite; the virus was found only in the lumen of the gut, suggesting it was merely eaten.

"The presence of deformed wing virus in large amounts in mite faeces suggests it is picked up during feeding on an infected bee," said Professor Santillan-Galicia. "However, one important question remains how is the virus transmitted to bees?"

One possibility is that the mouthparts of the mite could become contaminated with the virus during feeding, but this is an unlikely answer. Varroa mites cannot regurgitate their gut contents as there is a membrane in the oesophagus that acts as a non-return valve, so they could not pass the virus on this way either. Unfortunately, not enough is known about the anatomy of the mite, or their feeding mechanism, to suggest other routes of transmission.

"It is likely that the amount of virus acquired by the mite plays an important role in the interaction between deformed wing virus and the Varroa mite," said Professor Santillan-Galicia. "Full understanding of the interaction between deformed wing virus and the Varroa mite will provide basic information for the future development of more sustainable control strategies against the mite and the virus. Our work provides elements of understanding but further research in this area is needed."


'/>"/>

Contact: Lucy Goodchild
l.goodchild@sgm.ac.uk
44-118-988-1843
Society for General Microbiology
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Complexity of Crohns disease revealed as gene count tops 30
2. UIC researchers make promising finding in severe lung disease
3. International team identifies 21 new genetic risk factors for Crohns disease
4. Certain anticancer agents could be harmful to patients with heart disease
5. Best code for disease detection, bar none
6. New discoveries from Harvard and Baylor get to the heart of cardiovascular disease
7. Geisinger study: Inflammatory disease causes blindness
8. Gladstone and Izumi Bio in partnership in regenerative medicine and cardiovascular disease
9. Europe-wide investment in lipid research will help tackle disease, says new report
10. Mechanism explains link between apolipoprotein E and Alzheimers disease
11. A protein sequence associated with Huntington’s disease may become life-saving vaccine component
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/7/2017)... , Feb. 7, 2017 Zimmer Biomet ... in musculoskeletal healthcare, will present at the LEERINK Partners ... York Palace Hotel on Wednesday, February 15, 2017 at ... webcast of the presentation can be accessed at ... following the conference via Zimmer Biomet,s Investor Relations website ...
(Date:2/3/2017)... A new independent identity strategy consultancy firm announces its ... to fill a critical niche in technical and policy ... Mark Crego and Janice Kephart together ... that span federal governments, the 9/11 Commission, private industry, ... has a common theme born from a shared passion ...
(Date:2/1/2017)... February 1, 2017 IDTechEx Research, a leading ... technology, announces the availability of a new report, Sensors for ... Continue Reading ... ... collaborative robots. Source: IDTechEx Report "Sensors for Robotics: Technologies, Markets and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/17/2017)...  If only one in every hundred cells ... to chemotherapy, thousands of cancer cells would remain ... finding these mutations in ever-smaller subpopulations of tumor ... in blood — to guide treatment decisions and ... however, detecting these genetic anomalies may be more ...
(Date:2/16/2017)... ... February 16, 2017 , ... Avomeen & MichBio will ... event will be held at Avomeen Analytical Services (4840 Venture Dr., Ann Arbor, Michigan ... organization. They provide an opportunity to interact with peers, make new connections and talk ...
(Date:2/16/2017)...  ArmaGen, Inc., a privately held biotechnology company ... neurological disorders, today reported preliminary evidence of cognitive ... investigational therapy for the treatment of Hurler and ... or MPS I). The initial results from an ... at the 13 th annual WORLD Symposium ...
(Date:2/16/2017)... February 16, 2017 Patient ... of innovative telemedicine application, new and leading edge ... experiencing a boom worldwide. The healthcare sector as ... technologies, services and new therapies for companies such ... RHT), Cellectar Biosciences, Inc. (NASDAQ: CLRB ...
Breaking Biology Technology: