Navigation Links
Bacterial persistence in streams
Date:8/5/2008

MADISON, WI, AUGUST 4, 2008 A research team from the University of Tennessee (UT) has completed a study on an East Tennessee river to determine the connection between watershed hydrology and fecal bacteria statistical time series analysis. Shesh Koirala and colleagues report their findings in the July-August issue of the Journal of Environmental Quality. The article presents a study of the temporal patterns and statistical persistence of total coliform based on data gathered from the Little River near an intake at a public water supply plant. The research was funded by UT's Center for Environmental Biotechnology.

The presence of bacteria from fecal pollution continues to be a problem in both rural and urban streams in the United States. Since 1990, when the U.S. EPA adopted the Coliform Rule, the presence of total coliform in water distribution systems has been closely monitored as an indicator of fecal pollution and possible bacterial or viral enteric pathogens. Many public water supply operations have monitored total coliform presence in streams near water intakes to assess the quality of the water prior to treatment. Coliform bacteria are often present in nature, however bacteria in certain streams, particularly total coliform, may indicate on-going and ever-present issues related to fecal pollution and bacterial transport within watersheds. The UT research team investigated the temporal relationship between watershed processes and the presence of bacteria to better determine management needs related to potential pollution sources.

For the UT study, daily samples were collected from the Little River by water plant personnel, and the time series was analyzed to determine the persistence of total coliform in the stream. The analysis included both time-domain and frequency-domain approaches for comparison purposes. Koirala's team discovered that total coliform bacteria exhibit both short-term and long-term persistence at four-week and one-year intervals. Comparison of the total coliform time series with hydrologic data indicated that short-term persistence is dominated by runoff events, whereas longer-term persistence is likely related to baseflow, or groundwater, supply.

The UT research team's study will help scientists develop better conceptual models and provide direct benefit to local communities contending with fecal pollution. The UT team has been working closely with regional watershed groups to facilitate technology transfer and guide use of these data in managing watersheds. The researchers continue to build upon this study, as well as previous efforts, to devise better tools for quantifying fecal bacteria loads and defining temporal behavior in hydrologic watershed processes. These outcomes will assist local communities in improving management of their water supplies.


'/>"/>

Contact: Sara Uttech
suttech@agronomy.org
608-268-4948
American Society of Agronomy
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Legionnaires bacterial proteins work together to survive
2. Scripps research team blocks bacterial communication system to prevent deadly staph infections
3. Small RNA plays parallel roles in bacterial metabolism
4. New drug targets may fight tuberculosis and other bacterial infections in novel way
5. Bacterial infections in premature babies more common than previously realized
6. Tomato pathogen genome may offer clues about bacterial evolution at dawn of agriculture
7. Biochemists reveal details of mysterious bacterial microcompartments
8. Biologists surprised to find parochial bacterial viruses
9. Tomato pathogen genome may offer clues about bacterial evolution
10. Bacterial slime helps cause serious disease
11. A survivor in Greenland: A novel bacterial species is found trapped in 120,000-year-old ice
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/16/2017)... , May 16, 2017   Bridge ... health organizations, and MD EMR Systems , ... development partner for GE, have established a partnership ... Portal product and the GE Centricity™ products, including ... EMR. These new integrations will ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... The global military biometrics market ... by the presence of several large global players. The ... major players - 3M Cogent, NEC Corporation, M2SYS Technology, ... 61% of the global military biometric market in 2016. ... military biometrics market boast global presence, which has catapulted ...
(Date:4/13/2017)... MONICA, Calif. , April 13, 2017 ... New York will feature emerging and evolving ... Summits. Both Innovation Summits will run alongside the expo ... of speaker sessions, panels and demonstrations focused on trending ... coast,s largest advanced design and manufacturing event will take ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/22/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Building on the success of the inaugural RAADfest last year, ... latest developments in radical life extension. RAADfest combines cutting edge science presented for a ... personal development, making it the largest most comprehensive and inclusive super longevity event in ...
(Date:6/22/2017)... ... ... The first human cell line HeLa, established in 1951, has entered cell ... human cell lines with HeLa cells were published. Until recently, cross-contamination and misidentification of ... associated with dramatic consequences for research. , In this educational webinar, which is ...
(Date:6/20/2017)... Fairfield, Iowa (PRWEB) , ... June 20, 2017 ... ... a chance to immediately determine the adulterants which pose the most likely threat ... 25 - 28 of this year. , IFT's annual food expo attracts ...
(Date:6/19/2017)... NJ (PRWEB) , ... June 19, 2017 , ... ... for overseeing all service activities supporting EDETEK’s products including training, implementation, support, and ... experience to his new role. He has previously held leadership roles for service ...
Breaking Biology Technology: