Navigation Links
BYU's smart object recognition algorithm doesn't need humans
Date:1/16/2014

If we've learned anything from post-apocalyptic movies it's that computers eventually become self-aware and try to eliminate humans.

BYU engineer Dah-Jye Lee isn't interested in that development, but he has managed to eliminate the need for humans in the field of object recognition. Lee has created an algorithm that can accurately identify objects in images or video sequences without human calibration.

"In most cases, people are in charge of deciding what features to focus on and they then write the algorithm based off that," said Lee, a professor of electrical and computer engineering. "With our algorithm, we give it a set of images and let the computer decide which features are important."

Not only is Lee's genetic algorithm able to set its own parameters, but it also doesn't need to be reset each time a new object is to be recognizedit learns them on its own.

Lee likens the idea to teaching a child the difference between dogs and cats. Instead of trying to explain the difference, we show children images of the animals and they learn on their own to distinguish the two. Lee's object recognition does the same thing: Instead of telling the computer what to look at to distinguish between two objects, they simply feed it a set of images and it learns on its own.

In a study published in the December issue of academic journal Pattern Recognition, Lee and his students demonstrate both the independent ability and accuracy of their "ECO features" genetic algorithm.

The BYU algorithm tested as well or better than other top object recognition algorithms to be published, including those developed by NYU's Rob Fergus and Thomas Serre of Brown University.

Lee and his students fed their object recognition program four image datasets from CalTech (motorbikes, faces, airplanes and cars) and found 100 percent accurate recognition on every dataset. The other published well-performing object recognition systems scored in the 95-98% range.

The team has also tested their algorithm on a dataset of fish images from BYU's biology department that included photos of four species: Yellowstone cutthroat, cottid, speckled dace and whitefish. The algorithm was able to distinguish between the species with 99.4% accuracy.

Lee said the results show the algorithm could be used for a number of applications, from detecting invasive fish species (think of the carp in Utah Lake) to identifying flaws in produce such as apples on a production line.

"It's very comparable to other object recognition algorithms for accuracy, but, we don't need humans to be involved," Lee said. "You don't have to reinvent the wheel each time. You just run it."


'/>"/>

Contact: Todd Hollingshead
toddh@byu.edu
801-422-8373
Brigham Young University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. UD-developed smart gels deliver medicine on demand
2. Programming smart molecules
3. Keep Track of Your Children & Pets With TRAX - the New Smart GPS-Tracker
4. Bait research focused on outsmarting destructive beetle
5. Social networks make us smarter
6. Fujitsu Launches Four Smartphones and Two Tablet PCs With FPC Embedded Fingerprint Technology for the Japanese Market
7. National Robotics Initiative grant to create smarter surgical robots
8. Improved smartphone microscope brings single-virus detection to remote locations
9. Researchers use smart phone photography to diagnose eye disease
10. FPC Awarded new Smartphone DW From Existing Prominent Asian OEM Customer for Launch With Leading US Operator
11. SmartMove, Inc. receives $200,000 grant from the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
BYU's smart object recognition algorithm doesn't need humans
(Date:4/11/2017)... 11, 2017 Crossmatch®, a globally-recognized leader ... today announced that it has been awarded a ... Activity (IARPA) to develop next-generation Presentation Attack Detection ... "Innovation has been a driving force within Crossmatch ... allow us to innovate and develop new technologies ...
(Date:4/6/2017)... 6, 2017 Forecasts by Product ... Readers, by End-Use (Transportation & Logistics, Government & Public ... & Fossil Generation Facility, Nuclear Power), Industrial, Retail, Business ... Are you looking for a definitive report on ... ...
(Date:4/4/2017)... YORK , April 4, 2017   EyeLock ... today announced that the United States Patent and Trademark ... patent broadly covers the linking of an iris image ... same transaction) and represents the company,s 45 th ... latest patent is very timely given the multi-modal biometric ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... 2017 , ... ComplianceOnline’s Medical Device Summit is back for its 4th year. ... San Francisco, CA. The Summit brings together current and former FDA office bearers, regulators, ... government officials from around the world to address key issues in device compliance, quality ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... a leading provider of patient support solutions, has announced the ... which will launch this week. The VMS CNEs will address ... enhance the patient care experience by delivering peer-to-peer education programs ... to help women who have been diagnosed and are being ... ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... Tbilisi, Georgia (PRWEB) , ... October 11, 2017 , ... ... disaster, taking the lives of over 5.5 million people each year. Especially those living ... the greenovative startup Treepex - based in one of the most pollution-affected countries globally ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... Singh Biotechnology today announced ... to SBT-100, its novel anti-STAT3 (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3) B ... to cross the cell membrane and bind intracellular STAT3 and inhibit its function. ...
Breaking Biology Technology: