Navigation Links
BU team wins $4.1M genome grant
Date:9/15/2010

BOSTON (9-15-10) -- A team led by Boston University biomedical engineering researchers has won a $4.1 million, four-year grant from the National Institutes of Health to refine its nanoscale, low-cost, ultra-fast DNA sequencing method that could lead to individual genome sequencing for less than $1,000.

Developed in the past four years on an initial, $2.2 million NIH grant and led by Boston University Biomedical Engineering Professor Amit Meller, the project is one of 10 to receive funding from the NIH National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) this year under its "Revolutionary Sequencing Technology Development$1,000 Genome" program. The new NHGRI awards were announced this week.

Since its founding in 2004, the $1,000 Genome program has produced innovations that have reduced the cost of genome sequencing from $10 million to $20,000, and cut the time needed to complete the process from a few months to a week. But reaching the $1,000 mark will require creative, unprecedented approaches.

Toward that end, Meller and his team have already demonstrated the first use of solid state nanoporesfour-nanometer-wide holes in silicon chips that read DNA strands as they pass throughto optically sequence the four nucleotides that encode each DNA molecule. Their novel, highly efficient, optically-based method to detect single DNA molecules in nanopores could significantly reduce the cost of DNA sequencing and the time required to sequence a complete human genome.

"We are the first to employ optical detection from individual nanopores, and this allows us to probe multiple pores simultaneously using a single high-speed CCD camera," said Meller, referring to the charge-coupled devices that researchers use to obtain high-quality images. "As a result, our method can be scaled up vastly, ultimately allowing us to probe thousands of nanopores and obtain unprecedented DNA sequencing throughput."

Combining optical detection capability with the ability to analyze extremely long DNA molecules with superior sensitivity, the team's solid state nanopores are uniquely positioned to compete with current, third-generation DNA sequencing methods for cost, speed and accuracy. Unlike those approaches, the new nanopore method does not rely on enzymes whose activity limits the rate at which DNA sequences can be read; instead, readout speed is restricted only by current optical detection limits.

"This puts us in the unique advantageous position of being able to claim that our sequencing method is as fast as the rapidly evolving CCD/CMOS technologies," said Meller. "We currently have the capability of reading out about 100 bases per second, which is already much faster than other commercial third generation methods. This is only the starting point for us, and we expect to significantly increase this rate in the next year."

Licensing intellectual property from Boston University and Harvard University, Meller and his collaborators founded NobleGen Biosciences last February to develop and commercialize nanopore sequencing based on the new method. Researchers from the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester are also working on the current project.

"Given the aggressive research and development effort that's now underway, I estimate that it will take less than five years to bring a highly competitive and cheap DNA sequencing to the medical marketplace" said Meller.


'/>"/>

Contact: Mike Seele
mseele@bu.edu
617-353-9766
Boston University College of Engineering
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. NC State researchers get to root of parasite genome
2. Worm genome offers clues to evolution of parasitism
3. Complete Genomics launches, becomes worlds first large-scale human genome sequencing company
4. Diatom genome helps explain success in trapping excess carbon in oceans
5. Washington University scientists first to sequence genome of cancer patient
6. Research consortium to sequence turkey genome
7. DOE Joint Genome Institute completes soybean genome
8. Breast cancer genome shows evolution, instability of cancer
9. In lung cancer, silencing one crucial gene disrupts normal functioning of genome
10. Gene switch sites found mainly on shores, not just islands of the human genome
11. Genome Medicine: Bridging the gap between research and clinical practice
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
BU team wins $4.1M genome grant
(Date:12/22/2016)... VIEW, Calif. , Dec. 20, 2016  As part ... levels, 23andMe, the leading personal genetics company, recently released its ... Me . The book focuses on the topics of ... Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) taught in elementary school classrooms ... second in a series by illustrator Ariana Killoran , ...
(Date:12/19/2016)... , España y TORONTO , 19 de ... con Northern Biologics Inc. que permitirá el desarrollo acelerado de MSC-1, ... clínicos en varios tipos de tumor en 2017, con múltiples sitios ... ... su clase con objetivo en el factor inhibidor de leucemia (LIF), ...
(Date:12/15/2016)... and BADEN-BADEN, Germany , December 15, ... global financial services provider, today announced an agreement with NuData ... biometrics, to join forces. The partnership will enable clients to ... in compliance with local data protection regulation. ... In order to provide ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/17/2017)... ... January 17, 2017 , ... Pono Ola , a mind-body ... lifestyle, announced today the official launch of its much-anticipated Pono Board: a re-invented fitness ... , In development for over a year, the patented Pono Board is the world’s ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... Ohio , Jan. 17, 2017  On January ... the 35th Annual J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference in ... Joseph D. Kittle, Jr. , spoke to pharmaceutical leaders ... developed by ProclaRx to break down and destroy biofilms.  ... protect bacteria and prevent antibiotics and the body,s immune ...
(Date:1/14/2017)... CA (PRWEB) , ... January 14, 2017 , ... ... Proximo™, a new service providing complete end-to-end genome assemblies to researchers around the ... genomes eliminates a major obstacle in answering a wide range of scientific questions. ...
(Date:1/13/2017)... ... January 13, 2017 , ... FireflySci has been busy ... among its diverse customer base. The latest entry in this field is a ... BTX and Bio-Rad. FireflySci is introducing three distinct varieties including a 10x1mm, 10x2 ...
Breaking Biology Technology: