Navigation Links
BIDMC scientist John Rinn, Ph.D., receives Damon-Runyon Rachleff Innovation Award
Date:1/22/2009

BOSTON AND NEW YORK The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation announced today that Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center researcher John Rinn, PhD, has been awarded a 2009 Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovation Award. The three-year $450,000 prize is made to early-career researchers who are using "novel approaches to fighting cancer."

Rinn, who is also a member of the faculty at the Broad Institute in Cambridge and Assistant Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School is one of three investigators selected from nearly 300 applicants nationwide.

"We're thrilled with the caliber of the people and the proposals received this year," noted Andy Rachleff, who together with his wife Debbie partnered with the Damon Runyon Foundation to create the Innovation Award in 2007. "A large number of investigators submitted applications that proposed to take significant risks in order to achieve breakthroughs in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. As a venture capitalist, I look for visionaries with daring ideas. It is exciting to see these qualities in all of the winning proposals."

Adds Lorraine Egan, Executive Director of the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, "Most research funded today is safe and incremental. For large breakthroughs, we need to take risks. We're delighted to once again be funding such innovative ideas."

Rinn's work focuses on a class of molecule known as lincRNAs, an acronym for large intergenic non-coding RNAs. Based on earlier research that identified the first lincRNA a molecule called HOTAIR that plays a major role is establishing the distinct identities of skin cells -- Rinn proposes to further decipher the workings of these molecules, believing that they may have an important role in tumor function.

"LincRNAs could herald a new paradigm in our understanding of cellular transformation, including how cancerous cells metastasize," says Rinn. "Defining the roles of these RNA molecules in cancer could open up new avenues for better diagnostics and therapeutics. If we can crack the 'code' of how lincRNAs establish normal states, we can understand what goes wrong in cancers. We could then engineer these RNA molecules to target and silence cancer genes, thus restoring the genome back to its proper identity."

"John Rinn's work pushes the scientific envelope," adds BIDMC Chairman of Pathology Jeffrey Saffitz, MD, PhD. "His innovative ideas and willingness to challenge traditional scientific thinking are translating into key discoveries, many of which have been developed through novel experimental methods. He truly encompasses a spirit of risk-taking and innovation."

After completing his undergraduate work in chemistry at the University of Minnesota, Rinn received a doctorate in molecular biophysics and biochemistry from Yale University. He is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including the AAAS Biovision Fellowship, the McDougal Fellowship and the Damon Runyon Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship. Prior to joining BIDMC and the Broad Institute, Rinn was a member of the Howard Chang laboratory at Stanford University.


'/>"/>

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. UK scientists working to help cut ID theft
2. Scientists show that mitochondrial DNA variants are linked to risk factors for type 2 diabetes
3. Comet probes reveal evidence of origin of life, scientists claim
4. Scientists link fragile X tremor/ataxia syndrome to binding protein in RNA
5. Male elephants get photo IDs from scientists
6. Scientists retrace evolution with first atomic structure of an ancient protein
7. Muscle mass: Scientists identify novel mode of transcriptional regulation during myogenesis
8. Carnegie Mellon scientists develop nanogels that enable controlled delivery of carbohydrate drugs
9. Clemson scientists shed light on molecules in living cells
10. Scientists tackle mystery mountain illness
11. T. rex quicker than Becks, say scientists
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/22/2016)... PROVO and SANDY, Utah ... Ontario (NSO), which operates the highest sample volume laboratory ... and Tute Genomics and UNIConnect, leaders in clinical sequencing ... announced the launch of a project to establish the ... panel. NSO has been contracted by ...
(Date:3/15/2016)... , March 15, 2016 ... report published by Transparency Market Research "Digital Door Lock Systems ... Forecast 2015 - 2023," the global digital door lock systems ... Mn in 2014 and is forecast to grow at a ... of micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) across the world ...
(Date:3/11/2016)... , March 11, 2016 http://www.apimages.com ) ... Cross reference: Picture is available at AP Images ( http://www.apimages.com ) ... DERMALOG will be used to produce the new refugee identity cards. ... biometric innovations, at CeBIT in Hanover next ... from DERMALOG will be used to produce the new refugee identity ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/31/2016)... ... May 31, 2016 , ... ... announces Limfinity® version 6.2, a minor release with several important advancements to ease ... In the past several years, Limfinity® has become one of the most sought ...
(Date:5/31/2016)... ... May 31, 2016 , ... Scientists at two major cancer research centers say ... as surgery patients who are younger. Surviving Mesothelioma has just published an article on ... at Duke and Stanford Universities analyzed data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results ...
(Date:5/31/2016)... ... May 31, 2016 , ... ... molecular imaging systems, today announced that their compact PET scanner called NuPETâ„¢ ... has been selected by the University of Arizona (UA). , PET and MRI ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... May 27, 2016 , ... NeuMedics Inc. is pleased to announce ... Science Innovation Northwest on June 2, 2016. The session begins at 1:10 PM and ... microemulsion can be successfully used as a topical agent and a treatment for ophthalmic ...
Breaking Biology Technology: