Navigation Links
BIDMC scientist David J. Friedman, M.D., receives award from Doris Duke Charitable Foundation
Date:7/20/2011

BOSTON David J. Friedman, MD, a clinician and scientific investigator in the Division of Nephrology and Center for Vascular Biology Research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) has been selected to receive a Clinical Scientist Development Award (CSDA) from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The three-year award, which totals $486,000, will support Friedman's research into the genetic and environmental factors that lead to kidney disease in African Americans, in particular the role of a gene called APOL1.

"As investigators, physician-scientists face a particularly large challenge: meeting both the demands of seeing patients and conducting research," said Betsy Myers, Director of the Medical Research Program for the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. "Supporting the work of promising investigators while they're still early in their careers remains critical to keeping the clinical research workforce strong."

A graduate of Harvard College, Friedman received his medical degree from the Yale School of Medicine and went on to complete his residency at BIDMC. From 2003 to 2005 he was a Clinical Fellow in BIDMC's Division of Nephrology and from 2004 to 2007 was a Research Fellow in the Division of Nephrology. An Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS), Friedman is the recipient of numerous HMS teaching awards.

"Dr. Friedman's important work may one day translate into new diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies to help prevent end-stage renal disease," explains BIDMC Chief of Nephrology Martin Pollak, MD. Last year Pollak and Friedman co-authored a paper in the journal Science that identified two common coding variants in the APOL1 gene on chromosome 22 which greatly increase the risk of end-stage renal disease in African Americans. "This devastating and costly condition affects nearly 500,000 people in the United States, and is four to five times more common in African Americans compared to Caucasian Americans. Clearly, new diagnostic and treatment options are needed," adds Pollak.

Furthermore, says Friedman, as many as 3.5 million African Americans likely have the high risk APOL1 genotype.

"This gene increases a person's risk of developing kidney failure approximately 10-fold," he explains. "Investigating this gene is particularly challenging because only humans and a few primate species have the APOL1 gene in their genomes. Studies in patients with the disease are essential, and with this support from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, we hope to develop a better understanding of the genetic and environmental influences that modify the major APOL1 risk alleles."


'/>"/>

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. BIDMC scientist John Rinn, Ph.D., receives Damon-Runyon Rachleff Innovation Award
2. Cutting-edge imaging techniques for neuroscientists available in latest laboratory manual
3. New duck-billed dinosaur gives scientists clues to evolution of head ornamentation and provinciality
4. Scripps Research scientists create vaccine against heroin high
5. Hebrew U. scientists show for first time how early human embryo acquires its shape
6. Plenary speakers address challenges in the delivery of sustained antiretroviral therapy in developing countries, call for social scientists to take their place at the HIV/AIDS policy-making table, and stress the need for a long-term response to AIDS
7. OHSU scientists discover new role for vitamin C in the eye -- and the brain
8. Scientists to assemble knowledgebase on plants, microbes, to aid US biofuel, environment efforts
9. BUSM professor selected as American Heart Association Distinguished Scientist
10. Simple little spud helps scientists crack potatos mighty genome
11. Scientists discover first gonorrhea strain resistant to all available antibiotics
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/28/2016)... , April 28, 2016 First quarter ... (139.9), up 966% compared with the first quarter of 2015 ... totaled SEK 589.1 M (loss: 18.8) and the operating margin was ... (loss: 0.32) Cash flow from operations was SEK 249.9 ... 2016 revenue guidance is unchanged, SEK 7,000-8,500 M. The ...
(Date:4/15/2016)... April 15, 2016 Research ... Gait Biometrics Market 2016-2020,"  report to their offering.  ... ) , ,The global gait biometrics market is ... during the period 2016-2020. Gait analysis ... can be used to compute factors that are ...
(Date:3/29/2016)... 2016 LegacyXChange, Inc. (OTC: ... SelectaDNA/CSI Protect are pleased to announce our successful effort ... variety of writing instruments, ensuring athletes signatures against counterfeiting ... from athletes on LegacyXChange will be assured of ongoing ... Bill Bollander , CEO states, "By ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/27/2016)...   Ginkgo Bioworks , a leading organism ... today awarded as one of the World Economic ... most innovative companies. Ginkgo Bioworks is engineering biology ... world in the nutrition, health and consumer goods ... customers including Fortune 500 companies to design microbes ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... ... its second eBook, “Clinical Trials Patient Recruitment and Retention Tips.” Partnering with experienced ... this eBook by providing practical tips, tools, and strategies for clinical researchers. , ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... HOUSTON , June 23, 2016 ... agreement with the Cy-Fair Sports Association to serve ... of the agreement, Houston Methodist Willowbrook will provide ... education and connectivity with association coaches, volunteers, athletes ... partner with the Cy-Fair Sports Association and to ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... Supplyframe, the Industry Network for ... Design Lab . Located in Pasadena, Calif., the Design Lab’s mission is to ... are designed, built and brought to market. , The Design Lab is Supplyframe’s ...
Breaking Biology Technology: