Navigation Links
Australian study sheds light on kidney repair and disease
Date:9/30/2009

A study by Monash University researchers has shed new light on the microscopic antennas in the kidney that are involved in the organ's repair process.

The work may be a crucial step towards a cure for polycystic kidney disease, a potentially fatal disease that affects more than one in 1000 people.

The study, led by Dr James Deane a researcher at the Centre for Inflammatory Disease at the Monash Medical Centre, showed how kidney repair processes are controlled and helps explain the cause of polycystic kidney disease.

The findings have appeared in the latest edition of world's leading kidney research publication, the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

"We have shown for the first time that the hair-like structures on kidney cells, called cilia, change their length in response to injury in human patients, growing up to four times their original length in the later stages of kidney repair," Dr Deane said.

"These hair-like structures are antennas and the increases in their length amplify the signals they send to kidney cells at vital stages of repair. We think this is how they turn off the repair process when it is complete and allow the kidney to start working normally again"

Dr Deane said that if the switching on and off the repair process is not properly controlled, rapidly reproducing cells will distort the tubes of the kidney and prevent them from functioning properly, which is what appears to happen in people that have polycystic kidney disease, a condition which is currently untreatable.

"Our research helps put a logical framework behind what is happening in polycystic kidney disease, as the mutations that cause the disease can damage the hair-like structures of kidneys cells," Dr Deane said.

"We hope that this work will lead to new ways of treating both kidney injury and polycystic kidney disease."

The kidney is made up of about a million tiny living tubes that produce urine to rid the body of waste products. The cells that make up these tubes have hair-like structures, which are two thousandths of a millimetre long and respond to urine flow by sending reassuring signals back to the cells.

In an injured kidney there is a reduction in urine flow and reassuring signals from the hair-like structures are diminished. This causes kidney cells go into repair mode. Surviving kidney cells take on a new form that allows them to reproduce rapidly to replace cells that have died. When enough cells have been produced it is important that kidney cells stop reproducing and return to their normal form. This is where some extra input from the hair-like structures appears to be required.


'/>"/>

Contact: Dr James Deane
james.deane@med.monash.edu.au
61-395-945-528
Monash University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Invasive Australian jellyfish sighted in Gulf of Mexico in summer 2007
2. Australian researchers develop treatment to treat obesity
3. Fertilizer research center an Australian first
4. Oldest Australian crayfish fossils provide missing evolutionary link
5. Australian frog species chooses not to put eggs in 1 basket
6. Crafty Australian crayfish cheat
7. Australian filmmakers are stars of science film awards
8. Energy experts helping Australian households reduce carbon emissions
9. Childhood obesity indicates greater risk of school absenteeism, Penn study reveals
10. A study by the MUHC and McGill University opens a new door to understanding cancer
11. Study begins to reveal clues to the cause and progression of sepsis
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/22/2016)... , June 22, 2016   Acuant ... and verification solutions, has partnered with RightCrowd ... solutions for Visitor Management, Self-Service Kiosks and ... products that add functional enhancements to existing ... corporations and venues with an automated ID ...
(Date:6/20/2016)... 2016 Securus Technologies, a leading provider ... public safety, investigation, corrections and monitoring announced that ... has secured the final acceptance by all three ... Access Systems (MAS) installed. Furthermore, Securus will have ... installed by October, 2016. MAS distinguishes between legitimate ...
(Date:6/9/2016)... , June 9, 2016  Perkotek an innovation leader in attendance control systems ... seamlessly log work hours, for employers to make sure the right employees are actually ... http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160609/377486LOGO ... ... ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... Rolf K. Hoffmann, former ... of the University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School effective June ... UNC Kenan-Flagler, with a focus on the school’s international efforts, leading classes and ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... Ginkgo Bioworks , a leading organism design company ... as one of the World Economic Forum,s Technology ... companies. Ginkgo Bioworks is engineering biology to manufacture ... the nutrition, health and consumer goods sectors. The ... Fortune 500 companies to design microbes for their ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016 Epic Sciences ... detects cancers susceptible to PARP inhibitors by targeting ... cells (CTCs). The new test has already been ... in multiple cancer types. Over 230 ... damage response pathways, including PARP, ATM, ATR, DNA-PK ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... NC (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... Researchers ... the most commonly-identified miRNAs in people with peritoneal or pleural mesothelioma. Their findings are ... to read it now. , Diagnostic biomarkers are signposts in the blood, lung ...
Breaking Biology Technology: