Navigation Links
Asparagus benefits from X-ray treatment
Date:12/13/2011

MENOMONIE, WIAs consumer demand for convenient, nutritious foods increases, pre-cut and packaged fruit and vegetables become more popular. Food producers are looking to science to discover new ways to safely extend the shelf life of these "minimally processed" products. A potential solution to vegetables' short market life may be the lie in x-ray irradiation, the latest ionizing irradiation technology currently in use in commercial food operations.

Fresh green asparagus is one of the most popular minimally processed vegetables in the United States. High in fiber and essential nutrients, asparagus appears seasonally in markets across the U.S. A very limited shelf life, due in part to the vegetable's high respiration ratethe speed at which the plant takes in oxygen, breaks down starches and sugars, and releases carbon dioxidemakes packing and storing asparagus especially challenging. Other factors, such as asparagus' tendency toward rapid moisture loss and its susceptibility to bacteria invasion, create additional concerns for producers.

Researcher Joongmin Shin from the University of WisconsinStout, along with colleagues Bruce Harte, Janice Harte, and Kirk Dolan from Michigan State University, premiered a study in HortScience that gives vegetable and fruit producers new information about the use of x-ray technology to help extend the shelf life of fresh asparagus. Investigating the effect of low-dose x-ray irradiation treatment, the team found that the method significantly reduced aerobic bacteria and mold/yeast populations and helped to maintain sugar (glucose and fructose) levels in asparagus.

For the study, fresh-cut asparagus grown in Peru was sorted, cut, washed, immersed in sanitizer solution, and rinsed. The asparagus was then divided into three groups: a control group, vacuum skin-packaged (VSP) group, and vacuum skin-packaged plus x-ray irradiation (I-VSP) group. Asparagus in the I-VSP group were irradiated using a low-energy x-ray food irradiator. During a 24 day period the researchers measured headspace gas content, microbial growth, water soluble sugar content, and enzyme activity in all groups of asparagus.

"Irradiation treatment reduced aerobic bacteria (TPC) and mold/yeast populations significantly and helped to maintain sugar (glucose and fructose levels) in asparagus. In the study, irradiation temporarily increased PAL activity", said author Joongmin Shin. "We determined that that x-ray treatment will enhance consumer safety by decreasing the number of viable microorganisms on asparagus".

The report noted that additional studies are needed to evaluate any nutritional or sensory changes to asparagus before commercial feasibility of the x-ray technology can be determined.


'/>"/>

Contact: Michael W. Neff
mwneff@ashs.org
703-836-4606
American Society for Horticultural Science
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Benefits abound with recently patented system that reduces phosphorus in wastewater
2. 3 researchers in the Amazon clear up doubts as to the benefits of ecotourism
3. Advanced Medical Care for At-Risk Newborns Nets Economic Benefits
4. Report provides new analysis of carbon accounting, biomass use, and climate benefits
5. Commercial dry petfood has significant benefits for oral health in cats and dogs
6. Health benefits of broccoli require the whole food, not supplements
7. Everest expedition suggests nitric oxide benefits for intensive care patients
8. Eating balanced meals, farm-fresh produce benefits families, communities, nutrition researchers say
9. TGen breast cancer research benefits from $3.5 million Komen award
10. Despite proven benefits, few brain aneurysm patients receive specialized care
11. The benefits of biotech
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/24/2016)... patient care by providing unparalleled technology to leaders of the medical imaging industry.  As ... added to the range of products distributed by Ampronix. Photo - ... ... ... ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... , May 3, 2016  Neurotechnology, a ... the MegaMatcher Automated Biometric Identification System (ABIS) ... large-scale multi-biometric projects. MegaMatcher ABIS can process multiple ... using any combination of fingerprint, face or iris ... MegaMatcher SDK and MegaMatcher Accelerator , ...
(Date:4/19/2016)... April 20, 2016 The new ... a compact web-based "all-in-one" system solution for all door ... reader or the door interface with integration authorization management ... control systems. The minimal dimensions of the access control ... the building installations offer considerable freedom of design with ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... Rolf ... join the faculty of the University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School ... and entrepreneurship at UNC Kenan-Flagler, with a focus on the school’s international efforts, ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... Epic Sciences unveiled a liquid biopsy ... PARP inhibitors by targeting homologous recombination deficiency (HRD) ... test has already been incorporated into numerous clinical ... Over 230 clinical trials are investigating ... PARP, ATM, ATR, DNA-PK and WEE-1. Drugs targeting ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... UAS LifeSciences, ... launch of their brand, UP4™ Probiotics, into Target stores nationwide. The company, which ... to add Target to its list of well-respected retailers. This list includes such ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... -- Houston Methodist Willowbrook Hospital has signed a ... serve as their official health care provider. As ... provide sponsorship support, athletic training services, and most ... athletes and families. "We are excited ... to bring Houston Methodist quality services and programs ...
Breaking Biology Technology: