Navigation Links
Appetite genes are key to better diets for poultry, study shows

The welfare of poultry could be improved by a discovery about how chickens regulate their appetites.

Scientists have identified how a chicken's genetic make-up can affect the signals sent from its stomach to its brain that tell a chicken when it has had enough to eat.

Poultry farmers often have to restrict food for chickens because some birds are insensitive to feelings of fullness and can overeat, affecting their ability to reproduce.

The study could make it easier to develop methods to develop diets that reduce excess growth more naturally in these birds.

Researchers say that genetic differences, which affect when chickens recognise when they have had enough to eat, could date back thousands of years when chickens were first domesticated and breeds were selected for their size.

The research was carried out by The Roslin Institute at the University of Edinburgh.

Dr Ian Dunn, who led the study, said: "The findings shed greater light on food intake in birds and help us understand why some breeds in general the faster growing types of chickens are more insensitive to feelings of fullness than others."

The study, published in the American Journal of Physiology, Endocrinology and Metabolism, focused on a protein called cholecystokinin (CCK) that has a key role in sending signals linked to being full from the gut to the brain.

The researchers, funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, found that some birds were better equipped than others at recognising the protein, making them more effective in triggering signals of feeling full.

The study involved cross-breeding a fast-growing meat production strain of chicken with a relatively slow-growing, chicken. The researchers looked at how the protein was processed in both types of chickens and in the new cross breed.

They showed that reduced levels of protein that recognizes the fullness signal also affected the chicken's natural body weight.

Their findings back up the theory that, when poultry were domesticated thousands of years ago and bred for increased size, their appetite levels were changed. The study could also help inform research looking at appetite regulation in other animals.

Dr Dunn said: "All species regulate their appetites to make sure the amount of food taken in is just the right to maintain body weight and fat content. Our research has shown that there is genetic variation in the interpretation of biological signals sent relating to being full. This also affects what would be considered to be the natural body weight of chickens."


Contact: Tara Womersley
University of Edinburgh

Related biology news :

1. Appetite suppressant for scavenger cells
2. Low ghrelin -- reducing appetite at the cost of increased stress?
3. The appetite-suppressing effect of proteins explained
4. Genes may be reason some kids are picky about food
5. Researchers create map of shortcuts between all human genes
6. Sleator lab identifies single point mutation in Listeria monocytogenes
7. March of Dimes awards $250,000 to researcher who identified heart disease genes
8. 2 new genes linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and related disorders
9. Scientists find surprising new influence on cancer genes
10. MBL scientists find genes linked to human neurological disorders in sea lamprey genome
11. Schizophrenia genes increase chance of IQ loss
Post Your Comments:
(Date:5/16/2016)... May 16, 2016   EyeLock LLC , a ... the opening of an IoT Center of Excellence in ... expand the development of embedded iris biometric applications. ... of convenience and security with unmatched biometric accuracy, making ... aside from DNA. EyeLock,s platform uses video technology to ...
(Date:5/9/2016)... , UAE, May 9, 2016 ... it comes to expanding freedom for high net worth ... Even in today,s globally connected world, there is still ... system could ever duplicate sealing your deal with a ... second passports by taking advantage of citizenship via investment ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... FRANCISCO and BANGALORE, India , ... of EdgeVerve Systems, a product subsidiary of Infosys (NYSE: ... provider, today announced a global partnership that will ... way to use mobile banking and payment services. ... is a key innovation area for financial services, but it ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... Charm ... Mold) microbial test has received AOAC Research Institute approval 061601. , “This is ... last year,” stated Bob Salter, Vice President of Regulatory and Industrial Affairs. “The ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... June, 23, 2016  The Biodesign Challenge (BDC), a ... ways to harness living systems and biotechnology, announced its ... in New York City . ... students, showcased projects at MoMA,s Celeste Bartos Theater during ... , MoMA,s senior curator of architecture and design, and ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... , ... Supplyframe, the Industry Network for electronics hardware design ... Located in Pasadena, Calif., the Design Lab’s mission is to bring together inventors ... and brought to market. , The Design Lab is Supplyframe’s physical representation of ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... In a new case report ... detail how a patient who developed lymphedema after being treated for breast cancer benefitted ... change the paradigm for dealing with this debilitating, frequent side effect of cancer treatment. ...
Breaking Biology Technology: