Navigation Links
African Americans less likely to adhere to DASH diet for lowering blood pressure
Date:9/18/2012

Philadelphia, PA, September 19, 2012 The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, which promotes consumption of more fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products, and whole grain, and less meats and sweets, is a proven effective treatment for hypertension. For some individuals, adherence to the diet can be just as effective in lowering blood pressure as taking antihypertensive medication. A new study has found that greater adherence to the diet can lead to significant reductions in blood pressure, but that African Americans are less likely to adopt the diet compared to whites. The study is published online today in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

"After DASH dietary counseling, African Americans increased their consumption of DASH foods, but continued to lag behind whites in overall adherence to the DASH eating plan, consuming considerably more meat, sweets, and fat, and less fruit," reports lead investigator James A. Blumenthal, PhD, Professor of Behavioral Medicine in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, NC.

The study was a new analysis of the ENCORE study, which evaluated the effectiveness of the DASH diet alone and in combination with exercise training and weight reduction. 144 sedentary, overweight, and obese adults with high blood pressure were randomly assigned to three treatment groups. The first group ate the DASH diet and was engaged in weekly education, support, and feedback in group sessions. The second group also ate the DASH diet and received structured support and feedback, and in addition began a weight management program with caloric restriction, behavior modification, and aerobic exercise three times a week. The third group was instructed to maintain their normal diet and activity, but did not receive in instruction in the DASH diet nor were they encouraged to exercise or lose weight.

Researchers evaluated adherence to the diet, clinic and ambulatory blood pressure, and cardiorespiratory fitness. Participants also underwent a number of psychosocial assessments to evaluate their mental and social wellbeing and to identify potential predictors of dietary adherence including depression, anxiety, level of support from family and friends, and their beliefs about health and exercise. Demographic and background variables, including sex, age, ethnicity, income, education, and baseline body mass index were also examined.

After four months, participants in the DASH plus weight management group lost more weight compared to the DASH diet alone and control groups. There was no difference in dietary compliance between the DASH plus weight maintenance and the Dash alone groups. Participants with higher post-treatment DASH adherence scores had lower blood pressure levels, and the more participants adhered to the daily recommendations in the diet, the more their blood pressure decreased.

While both African-American and white participants in the DASH treatment groups increased their consumption of DASH foods after treatment, African Americans in both treatment groups had lower adherence scores compared to whites. No other demographic, behavioral, or social variable predicted DASH adherence.

"Strong cultural influences on food preferences, food preparation, and perceptions about eating practices might make it more challenging for African Americans to adhere to the DASH diet," Dr. Blumenthal notes. "In light of the considerable role that food plays in African-American culture, greater cultural sensitivity is likely to be needed to achieve greater adoption of the DASH eating pattern when prescribing dietary modification programs. For example, it might be more effective to modify traditional recipes to meet current nutritional guidelines rather than to recommend that such foods be eliminated altogether."

In a video accompanying the article, co-investigator Pao-Hwa Lin, PhD, a nutritionist from the Department of Medicine at Duke University Medical Center, discusses the implications of the study and possible reasons for lower adherence to the DASH diet in African Americans.


'/>"/>

Contact: Eileen Leahy
andjrnlmedia@elsevier.com
732-238-3628
Elsevier Health Sciences
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. UNH researchers find African farmers need better climate change data to improve farming practices
2. Treatment to benefit African infants at risk of endemic fever
3. African scientist, designer partner to fashion anti-malaria garment that wards off bugs
4. Herbivores select on floral architecture in a South African bird-pollinated plant
5. South African daffodils may be a future cure for depression
6. Levels of hepatitis C virus higher among African-Americans and males
7. African research identifies strong candidate for possible single-dose malaria cure
8. Costs for changing pollution criteria in Florida waters likely to exceed EPA estimates
9. Evidence shows that anti-depressants likely do more harm than good, researchers find
10. Nearly one-tenth of hemispheres mammals unlikely to outrun climate change
11. Girls mathematics performance more likely to suffer than boys as a result of mathematics anxiety
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/2/2016)... The Department of Transport Management (DOTM) of ... project, for the , Supply and Delivery of ... Infrastructure , to Decatur , ... Management Solutions. Numerous renowned international vendors participated in the tendering ... selected for the most compliant and innovative solution. The contract ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... , May 24, 2016 Ampronix facilitates superior patient care by providing unparalleled ... medical LCD display is the latest premium product recently added to the range of ... ... ... Sony 3d Imaging- LCD Medical Display- Ampronix News ...
(Date:5/9/2016)... May 9, 2016 Elevay is ... to expanding freedom for high net worth professionals seeking ... today,s globally connected world, there is still no substitute ... ever duplicate sealing your deal with a firm handshake. ... by taking advantage of citizenship via investment programs like ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... --  EpiBiome , a precision microbiome engineering company, today ... from Silicon Valley Bank (SVB). The financing will allow ... drug development efforts, as well as purchase additional lab ... been an incredible strategic partner to us – one ... provide," said Dr. Aeron Tynes Hammack , EpiBiome,s ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... ... STACS DNA Inc., the sample tracking software company, today announced that Dr. Hays ... DNA as a Field Application Specialist. , “I am thrilled that Dr. Young ... DNA. “In further expanding our capacity as a scientific integrator, Hays brings a wealth ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Apellis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced positive ... its complement C3 inhibitor, APL-2. The trials were ... studies designed to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics ... healthy adult volunteers. Forty subjects were ... dose (ranging from 45 to 1,440mg) or repeated ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 Andrew D ... http://doi.org/10.17925/OHR.2016.12.01.22 Published recently in ... from touchONCOLOGY, Andrew D Zelenetz , discusses ... care is placing an increasing burden on healthcare ... therapies. With the patents on many biologics expiring, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: