Navigation Links
African-Americans aware and accepting, but often do not receive, the HPV vaccine
Date:2/4/2009

CAREFREE, A.Z. - Although only 25 percent of eligible African-American adolescents have received the HPV vaccine, a new survey presented at the American Association for Cancer Research conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities, suggests they have a positive view of the treatment and might respond to more education.

The Pennsylvania Department of Public Health is funding research to develop ways to increase the rate of HPV vaccination among those at highest risk. HPV vaccination prevents cervical cancer by inoculating against the human papillomavirus.

"The consensus among those surveyed in our study was that it would be a good, beneficial option," said Ian Frank, M.D., professor of medicine in the Infectious Diseases Division of the University of Pennsylvania.

The HPV vaccine, approved for use in the United States as Gardasil and manufactured by Merck and Co., has been shrouded in controversy since it was released in June 2006.

Frank said the controversies break down into four basic areas. Following approval, Merck pushed for mandatory vaccination, which is generally opposed by citizens in the United States who believe health care decisions should not be forced. Others were concerned about the long-term efficacy of the vaccine or its possible side effects.

Most famously, some groups insisted that if adolescents were aware that they could inoculate themselves against the human papillomavirus, which is spread through sexual contact, they would be more likely to have early sexual relations.

"I doubt that whether or not she is at risk for cervical cancer is on an adolescent's mind in the heat of the moment," said Frank.

Frank said the African-Americans who participated in the survey conducted by his research group were aware of these controversies, but they did not outweigh their positive views of the vaccine as an option.

Researchers surveyed 71 females for the study; 94 percent were African-American and the mean age was 15.3 years. Approximately 60 percent of them had had their first sexual encounter when they were 14 years old.

Of those who had not received the vaccine, 43.9 percent said they were very likely or likely to do so soon. A majority believed it was a "good" or "very good" idea and they generally viewed the vaccine as "safe," "effective" and a "wise choice."

Forty-five caregivers of adolescents also participated in the study, all of whom were African-American, 94 percent were female and 47.9 percent had a high school diploma.

The caregivers agreed that the vaccine was "safe," "effective" and a "wise choice," but two-thirds of them could not recall their health care provider ever mentioning the HPV vaccine.

"Many of these caregivers, most of whom were women, reported feeling overwhelmed by the challenges of raising an adolescent girl, but they wanted to protect their daughters from health and emotional risks," said Frank. "This suggests they would respond positively to an increased effort to inoculate."


'/>"/>

Contact: Jeremy Moore
Jeremy.moore@aacr.org
267-646-0557
American Association for Cancer Research
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. New gene variant identified for nondiabetic end stage renal disease in African-Americans
2. African-Americans have unique lung cancer risks from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
3. Many African-Americans have a gene that prolongs life after heart failure
4. New genetic variant associated with prostate cancer in African-Americans
5. Aware Announces Q4 and FY2008 Earnings Conference Call
6. Aware Announces Q3 2008 Earnings Conference Call
7. Sun Microsystems and Aware, Inc. Announce Integration of Awares BioSP with Sun Identity Management Solutions
8. Aware Announces Q2 2008 Earnings Conference Call
9. Aware Announces Q1 2008 Earnings Conference Call
10. Despite awareness of global warming Americans concerned more about local environment
11. Aware, Inc. Reports Fourth Quarter and 2007 Financial Results
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/5/2017)... , April 5, 2017  The Allen Institute ... Allen Cell Explorer: a one-of-a-kind portal and dynamic digital ... 3D imaging data, the first application of deep learning ... human stem cell lines and a growing suite of ... platform for these and future publicly available resources created ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... ANGELES , March 30, 2017  On April ... Hack the Genome hackathon at Microsoft,s ... exciting two-day competition will focus on developing health and ... Hack the Genome is the ... been tremendous. The world,s largest companies in the genomics, ...
(Date:3/27/2017)... CENTRE, N.Y. , March 27, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ ... Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) Analytics ... Outpatient EMR Adoption Model sm . In addition, ... 12% of U.S. hospitals using an electronic medical ... CHS for its high level of EMR usage ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/7/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 06, ... ... years’ experience providing advanced instruments and applications consulting for microscopy and surface ... expertise in application consulting, Nanoscience Analytical offers a broad range of contract ...
(Date:10/7/2017)... 2017  The 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry ... Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard ... microscopy (cryo-EM) have helped to broaden the ... community. The winners worked with systems manufactured by ... highly resolved, three-dimensional images of protein structures that ...
(Date:10/6/2017)... ... October 06, 2017 , ... ... lunch discussion and webinar on INSIGhT, the first-ever adaptive clinical trial for glioblastoma ... Cancer Institute. The event is free and open to the public, but registration ...
(Date:10/5/2017)... ... 05, 2017 , ... Understanding the microbiome, the millions of bacteria that live ... You Are My Future, the newest exhibit on display at the University City Science ... condition through the lens of the gut microbiome. , Gut Love opens October ...
Breaking Biology Technology: