Navigation Links
Advertisers, neuroscientists trace source of emotions in brain
Date:2/19/2008

GAINESVILLE, Fla. First came direct marketing, then focus groups. Now, advertisers, with the help of neuroscientists, are closing in on the holy grail: mind reading.

At least, thats what is suggested in a paper published today in the journal Human Brain Mapping authored by a group of professors in advertising and communication and neuroscience at the University of Florida.

The seven researchers used sophisticated brain-scanning technology to record how subjects brains responded to television advertisements, while simultaneously collecting the subjects reported impressions of the ads. By comparing the two resulting data sets, they say, they pinned down specific locations in the brain as the seat of many familiar emotions that ripple throughout it. The feat is another step toward gauging how people feel directly through functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI, and other brain-scanning technology without relying on what they claim to be feeling, the researchers say.

We are getting to the heart of the matter by really showing this process in the brain, and how it works, said Jon Morris, a professor of advertising and communications and lead author of the article. We feel that this can be used to find out what people really feel about something, whether an advertisement or any other stimulus.

Using MRI or fMRI the former creates internal images of the brain, while the latter tracks blood flow within the brain to test consumers responses to advertisements or other stimuli is not new. But according to the study, much of the previous research has found that, for example, responses to pleasant or unpleasant stimuli occurred throughout many regions of the brain, rather than in one specific location. As a result, the technique seemed of limited usefulness: Analysts could gauge only general response activity, not specific emotions.

There was no real key happiness center, no key sad center, no key love center, Morris said. What you got was brain activity, in general.

The UF team used an elaborate experimental system, currently under consideration for a patent, to try to narrow the search.

Because metallic or magnetic material can cause fMRI machines to malfunction, no television or sound equipment was allowed in the cylinder-like fMRI machines into which people are inserted. As a result, the researchers deployed a series of projections and mirrors to allow subjects to watch commercials. Sound reached them via tiny plastic pipes, similar to headphones once common on airplanes, rather than wires.

The 12 subjects also had hand-held devices that enabled them to report their feelings via a system called Attitude Self Assessment Manikins a version of the UF-developed Self-Assessment Manikin, or SAM. The AdSAM system lets viewers describe how they are feeling and the strength of those feelings by clicking on projections of people-like icons, a process that Morris characterized as more direct than translating feelings into words. Morris uses the AdSAM system in his work as a consultant to advertisers.

Researchers showed the subjects three television commercials advertising Coke, Evian and Gatorade, respectively, as well as an anti-fur commercial and an ad promoting teaching. To guard against preconditioned response, all the ads were at least 10 years old.

The researchers compared the activity in the subjects brains as recorded by the fMRI machines to their reported responses on the AdSAM system. With several of the ads, they found the fMRI data and response converged on two of three measures pleasure-displeasure and excitement-calm. Under the AdSAM system, these bipolar dimensions as well as a third, dominance-submissiveness form the foundation for more specific emotions.

Where the researchers compared the AdSAM data on pleasure-displeasure and excitement-calm to the fMRI data, they found simultaneous spikes in four different and highly localized areas of the brain. According to the article, the findings suggest that human emotions are multidimensional, and that self-report techniques correspond to a specific task but different functional regions of the brain.

Morris said the results are preliminary, but that follow-up studies could allow researchers to hone in on peoples feelings with great specificity. That would be attractive to advertisers for obvious reasons, but psychologists might also find the techniques useful.

Back in the 1950s, three psychologists found that all emotions could be measured in three dimensions, Morris said. Now we have learned that this may be more than a method for reporting emotion. It may actually reflect the way creatures on this planet function possibly exposing a direct link to predicting behavior.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jon Morris
jonmorris@ufl.edu
352-392-0443
University of Florida
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Scientists retrace evolution with first atomic structure of an ancient protein
2. Computer program traces ancestry using anonymous DNA samples
3. Male contraception breakthroughs to be presented, Seattle Sept. 27-28
4. Contraception: progress brings hope for new methods for men
5. Effects of social isolation traced to brain hormone
6. High blood pressure in older adults traced to genes effects in blood vessels
7. Pittsburgh scientists identify human source of stem cells with potential to repair muscle
8. UNH becomes first university in nation to use landfill gas as primary energy source
9. New partnership offers outsourced R&D in membrane biology
10. HortTalks, a valuable scientific resource
11. Reversing cognitive deficits: Injectable antibody may attack source of problem
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/26/2016)... 2016 Research and Markets has ... Market 2016-2020"  report to their offering.  , ,     ... The analysts forecast the global multimodal biometrics market ... the period 2016-2020.  Multimodal biometrics is ... as the healthcare, BFSI, transportation, automotive, and government ...
(Date:4/15/2016)... 2016  A new partnership announced today will ... decisions in a fraction of the time it ... high-value life insurance policies to consumers without requiring ... Force Diagnostics, rapid testing (A1C, Cotinine and HIV) ... pressure, weight, pulse, BMI, and activity data) available ...
(Date:4/14/2016)... AVIV, Israel , April 14, 2016 ... Behavioral Authentication and Malware Detection, today announced the appointment ... already assumed the new role. Goldwerger,s leadership ... BioCatch, on the heels of the deployment of its ... addition, BioCatch,s behavioral biometric technology, which discerns unique cognitive ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) is pleased to announce 24 new Young Investigator ... Members of the Class of 2016 were selected from a pool of 128 ... About the Class of 2016 PCF Young Investigators ... ... ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... Supplyframe, the ... the Supplyframe Design Lab . Located in Pasadena, Calif., the Design Lab’s ... how hardware projects are designed, built and brought to market. , The Design ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... LOUISVILLE, Ky. , June 23, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... from two Phase 1 clinical trials of its ... double-blind, placebo-controlled, single and multiple ascending dose studies ... and pharmacodynamics (PD) of subcutaneous injection in healthy ... APL-2 subcutaneously (SC) either as a single dose ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... On Wednesday, June 22, 2016, the NASDAQ Composite ... Jones Industrial Average edged 0.27% lower to finish at 17,780.83; ... has initiated coverage on the following equities: Infinity Pharmaceuticals Inc. ... NKTR ), Aralez Pharmaceuticals Inc. (NASDAQ: ARLZ ), ... more about these stocks by accessing their free trade alerts ...
Breaking Biology Technology: