Navigation Links
Adverse effects of phthalates on ovarian response to IVF
Date:7/8/2013

London, 8 July 2013: Phthalates are among a group of industrial chemicals shown in some studies to have adverse effects on reproductive health and development, particularly in the male. As such, they have been collectively defined as "endocrine disruptors", and proposed as one of several possible environmental exposures responsible for a decline in fertility. They are classified in two groups - high molecular weight phthalates are used in the production of plastics, while low molecular weight phthalates are frequently used in the manufacture of cosmetics.(1) Human studies increasingly report associations of phthalates with various adverse reproductive outcomes, including altered semen quantity and quality. Their effect, however, has been less well studied in women, and, despite widespread human exposure to phthalates, little is known about the effects of low-level, daily exposures to phthalates on ovarian function - and hence on women's reproductive health.

A new study reported at this year's annual meeting of ESHRE by Dr Irene Souter of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, USA, now suggests that exposure to phthalates - as measured by levels of phthalate metabolites in urine - is associated with reduced fertility when defined as a response to IVF treatment. " Our data support the hypothesis that exposure to specific phthalates might lead to adverse female reproductive outcomes," said Dr Souter.

The study followed the progress of 231 women (in 325 fresh treatment cycles) scheduled for IVF at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 2004 and 2012; urine samples were taken at the start of and throughout treatment and analysed for metabolites of four primary phthalates.

The association of levels of urinary metabolites was then explored with three markers of response to IVF: the number of eggs produced following ovarian stimulation, embryo development, and implantation failure.

Results first showed that urinary phthalates were detected in almost all the women, reflecting the widespread level of exposure. Results also showed:

  • The odds of implantation failure increased with each rising quartile of two of the urinary phthalate metabolites. For example, for DEHP (used in vinyl plastic products) the odds of implantation failure in the highest quartile Q4) was twice that of the lowest (Q1).
  • There was also an escalating decrease of 4.17% (Q2), 6.19% (Q3) and 11.4% (Q4) in the number of oocytes retrieved with each DEHP phthalate quartile when compared with Q1 (the lowest reference quartile).

The results thus showed that urinary concentrations of some commonly used phthalates were "dose-dependently" associated with a lower yield of IVF oocytes, and an increased risk of implantation failure. However, the results did not detect any association between levels of urinary phthalates and rates of fertilisation or embryo development.

Commenting, Dr Souter believes the results "support the hypothesis" that phthalates are widespread in the environment and may well have an adverse effect on female fertility, particularly when tested in the model of IVF.

"We are all primarily exposed to phthalates through inhalation and ingestion," she explained. "It is extremely difficult if not impossible to avoid exposure to phthalates, since they are in so many products." However, she added, exposure can be reduced by the following:

  • Limit the use of personal care products with fragrances in them (including many of the modern baby care products and air fresheners).
  • Limit use of plastic food storage containers and plastic wraps (certainly do not heat food in them).
  • Read the labels and avoid children's toys made of plastics (vinyl) that contain phthalates.


'/>"/>

Contact: Christine Bauquis
christine@eshre.eu
32-499-258-046
European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. BPA linked to potential adverse effects on heart and kidneys
2. Carbon dioxide from water pollution, as well as air pollution, may adversely impact oceans
3. Diet could combat adverse side-effects of quinine
4. La Jolla Institute discovery could lead to new way to screen drugs for adverse reactions
5. Time is of the essence for reducing the long-term effects of iron deficiency
6. Patients use OTC NSAIDs even when they have a high risk of serious side effects
7. Hidden effects of climate change may threaten eelgrass meadows
8. Fish oil may stall effects of junk food on brain
9. Study examines effects of genetic variants for infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome
10. Olympic Coast Sanctuary report is first step in addressing effects of climate change
11. Symposium highlights epigenetic effects of milk
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/26/2016)... DUBLIN , April 27, 2016 ... of the  "Global Multi-modal Biometrics Market 2016-2020"  report ... ) , The analysts forecast ... a CAGR of 15.49% during the period 2016-2020.  ... a number of sectors such as the healthcare, ...
(Date:4/13/2016)... 13, 2016  IMPOWER physicians supporting Medicaid patients in ... new clinical standard in telehealth thanks to a new ... higi platform, IMPOWER patients can routinely track key health ... mass index, and, when they opt in, share them ... to a local retail location at no cost. By ...
(Date:3/22/2016)... India , March 22, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... market research report "Electronic Sensors Market for Consumer ... Proximity, & Others), Application (Communication & IT, ... Geography - Global Forecast to 2022", published ... industry is expected to reach USD 26.76 ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016 Epic ... sensitively detects cancers susceptible to PARP inhibitors by ... tumor cells (CTCs). The new test has already ... therapeutics in multiple cancer types. Over ... DNA damage response pathways, including PARP, ATM, ATR, ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... June 23, 2016   Boston Biomedical , ... compounds designed to target cancer stemness pathways, announced ... granted Orphan Drug Designation from the U.S. Food ... gastric cancer, including gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Napabucasin ... to inhibit cancer stemness pathways by targeting STAT3, ...
(Date:6/23/2016)...  The Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) is pleased to announce 24 ... for prostate cancer. Members of the Class of 2016 were selected from a ... Read More About the Class of 2016 PCF Young Investigators ... ... ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2016 , ... In a ... Hospital in Denmark detail how a patient who developed lymphedema after being treated for ... The results could change the paradigm for dealing with this debilitating, frequent side effect ...
Breaking Biology Technology: