Navigation Links
ALS TDI and Gladstone Institutes collaborate to discover potential ALS treatments

CAMBRIDGE, MA and SAN FRANCISCO, CADecember 4, 2012 The ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI) and the Gladstone Institutes today announced the formation of a research collaboration to speed the discovery of potential treatments for ALS through the preclinical drug development process.

"We are thrilled about the potential this collaboration holds to accelerate ALS therapeutic development," said Steve Perrin, PhD, CEO and Chief Scientific Officer at ALS TDI. "Both our organizations have unique infrastructures, and by linking them this way, we may be able to advance potential treatments faster than before."

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a neurodegenerative disease that leads to paralysisand eventually deathdue to the loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord and brain. About 30,000 people in the United States live with the disease at any given time, and the global population of ALS patients is approximately 400,000. Approximately 5,000 new cases of ALS are diagnosed in the United States each year, and there is no known cause, cure or treatment to halt or reverse the disease. The average patient survives only two to five years following their diagnosis.

Under this new agreement, which starts immediately, Gladstone will evaluate potential pharmaceutical compounds using a human model of ALS. Gladstone generated the model by transforming skin cells from ALS patients into stem cells, known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells), and then programming them into neurons. The technique builds on a discovery for which Shinya Yamanaka, MD, PhD, a Gladstone senior investigator, won the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

This particular iPS-based ALS model includes a gene mutation that produces TDP-43, a protein commonly found in most forms of ALS. Promising drug compounds that pass the initial evaluation process at Gladstone will be fast-tracked for pre-clinical testing at ALS TDI, which will assess the compounds for activity and efficacy in various mouse models of human neurodegeneration.

"We hope our human model of ALS will help us to move quickly and effectively to identify promising therapeutic candidates for ALS," said Gladstone Senior Investigator Steve Finkbeiner, MD, PhD, who is also a professor of neurology and physiology at the University of California, San Francisco, with which Gladstone is affiliated. "The strong evidence that abnormal TDP-43 protein is involved in the development of ALS, coupled with models that may replicate ALS more faithfully than other tools, may speed development of therapies for the thousands of individuals diagnosed with this devastating disease."

Contact: Diane Schrick
Gladstone Institutes

Related biology news :

1. Gladstone, Stanford scientists block toxic protein that plays key role in Lou Gehrigs disease
2. Gladstone scientists identify critical process in stem cell development
3. Gladstone scientist Warner C. Greene receives Washington University School of Medicine Alumni Award
4. TGen leads new National Institutes of Health study of brain tumors
5. USDA scientists collaborate with global researchers to advance the mapping of the barley genome
6. Astellas and DNDi to collaborate on new drug discovery research for the treatment of NTDs
7. BGI and Aspera collaborate on high-speed data exchange to advance genome research
8. HUNT Biosciences and SomaLogic collaborate to validate protein biomarkers of cardiovascular risk
9. American University biologist discovers new crab species
10. Hearty organisms discovered in bitter-cold Antarctic brine
11. Microbial missing link discovered after man impales hand on tree branch
Post Your Comments:
(Date:4/11/2017)... , April 11, 2017 Crossmatch®, ... secure authentication solutions, today announced that it has ... Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) to develop next-generation ... program. "Innovation has been a driving ... Thor program will allow us to innovate and ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... 11, 2017 No two people are ... the New York University Tandon School of Engineering ... found that partial similarities between prints are common ... mobile phones and other electronic devices can be ... vulnerability lies in the fact that fingerprint-based authentication ...
(Date:4/6/2017)... , April 6, 2017 Forecasts ... ANPR, Document Readers, by End-Use (Transportation & Logistics, Government ... Oil, Gas & Fossil Generation Facility, Nuclear Power), Industrial, ... Other) Are you looking for a definitive ... ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... United States multicenter, prospective clinical study that demonstrates the accuracy of the ... of identifying clinically significant acute bacterial and viral respiratory tract infections by ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... AMRI, a global contract ... to improve patient outcomes and quality of life, will now be offering its ... attributed to new regulatory requirements for all new drug products, including the finalization ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... At ... Purple announced Dr. Suneel I. Sheikh, the co-founder, CEO and chief research scientist ... has been selected for membership in ARCS Alumni Hall of Fame . ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... ... wash is a basic first aid supply for any work environment, but most personal eye ... first if a dangerous substance enters both eyes? It’s one less decision, and likely quicker ... eye piece. , “Whether its dirt and debris, or an acid or alkali, getting anything ...
Breaking Biology Technology: