Navigation Links
A revolutionary new model for Alzheimer's disease
Date:2/19/2009

A study from the Buck Institute for Age Research offers a revolutionary new model for Alzheimer's disease (AD), a devastating neurodegenerative disorder which afflicts 24 million people worldwide. In an effort to unravel the normal function of a protein implicated in AD, scientists in California and France have discovered a naturally occurring protein that provides a new therapeutic target for the disease. The finding upsets the current theory that AD is a disease of toxicity stemming from damage caused by sticky plaques that collect in the brain this research points to the condition as a disorder involving an imbalance in signaling between neurons. The study appears online in the Nature publication Cell Death and Differentiation.

One of the mysteries of AD has been the normal function of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) which are concentrated at the points where neurons connect. Even though the sticky amyloid plaques which have been viewed as a hallmark sign of AD result from APP, it seems unlikely that APP exists simply to cause Alzheimer's disease. In their study, scientists from the Buck Institute and the CNRS (Centre Nationale de la Recherche Scientifique) show that APP binds to netrin-1, a protein that helps to guide nerves and their connections in the brain, as well as helping nerve cells to survive. When netrin-1 was given to mice that have a gene for Alzheimer's disease their symptoms were reversed, and the sticky amyloid was reduced. These results suggest that the long-held belief that AD is caused by brain cell damage inflicted by the amyloid plaques may be wrong; instead, it is beginning to appear that the disease stems from an imbalance between the normal making and breaking of connections in the brain, with netrin-1 supporting the connections and the amyloid breaking the connections -- both by binding to APP and activating normal cell programs. Not only did the netrin-1 binding to APP keep the nerve cells alive and connected, but it also shut down the production of the amyloid, all of which makes it an interesting potential therapeutic.

"I think we're going to see an explosion in the next five years involving the dissection of these signaling pathways whose imbalance leads to Alzheimer's disease," said Buck Institute Faculty Member Dale Bredesen, MD, who led the California half of the French-Californian collaborative research. "We now believe that APP is part of a 'plasticity module' that functions in normal memory and forgetting, and that netrin-1 gives us an important starting point to restore the normal balance."

"We believe that Alzheimer's disease is somewhat analogous to cancer, which results from an imbalance between the normal processes that support cell survival and those that cause cell turnover," said Patrick Mehlen, PhD, Director of the Apoptosis, Cancer and Development CNRS Laboratory at the University of Lyon and co-senior author of the study. "Our hope is that this research will lead to therapeutics that will be used to address this imbalance much earlier in the disease process."

Research is underway to develop a drug based on the findings. The Buck Institute and the CNRS in Lyon are partnering with Neurobiological Technologies Inc., (NASDAQ: NTII) to bring the discovery from the laboratory to clinical trials.


'/>"/>

Contact: Kris Rebillot
krebillot@buckinstitute.org
415-717-3268
Buck Institute for Age Research
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Old developmental pathways spawn revolutionary evolutionary changes
2. M2SYS Introduces Revolutionary Biometric Artificial Intelligence Technology to Significantly Reduce Fingerprint Software False Reject Rates
3. Revolutionary CO2 maps zoom in on greenhouse gas sources
4. Revolutionary chefs? Not likely, shows physics research
5. Singapore-US scientists first to develop revolutionary microchip that uses 30 times less energy
6. Clemson chemists present revolutionary teaching concepts
7. Novel 3-D cell culture model shows selective tumor uptake of nanoparticles
8. A new kind of rat model
9. JILA finds flaw in model describing DNA elasticity
10. Smithsonian researchers develop models to assess wetland health
11. Prediction of RNA pseudoknots using heuristic modeling with mapping and sequential folding
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/23/2017)... ITHACA, N.Y. , June 23, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... leader in dairy research, today announced a new collaboration ... reduce the chances that the global milk supply is ... dairy project, Cornell University has become the newest academic ... Supply Chain, a food safety initiative that includes IBM ...
(Date:5/16/2017)... 16, 2017   Bridge Patient Portal , ... MD EMR Systems , an electronic medical ... GE, have established a partnership to build an ... the GE Centricity™ products, including Centricity Practice Solution ... These new integrations will allow healthcare delivery ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... a global expert in SoC-based imaging and computing solutions, has developed ... the company,s hybrid codec technology. A demonstration utilizing TeraFaces ® , ... showcased during the upcoming Medtec Japan at Tokyo Big Sight April ... Vegas Convention Center April 24-27. ... Click here for an image of the M820 ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... 2017 , ... A new study published in Fertility and ... in vitro fertilization (IVF) transfer cycles. The multi-center matched cohort study ... comparing the results from the fresh and frozen transfer cohorts, the authors of ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... CA (PRWEB) , ... October ... ... a development-stage cancer-focused pharmaceutical company advancing targeted antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) therapeutics, today ... of targeted HPLN (Hybrid Polymerized Liposomal Nanoparticle), a technology developed in collaboration ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... International research firm Parks Associates announced today that ... TMA 2017 Annual Meeting , October 11 in Scottsdale, ... security market and how smart safety and security products impact the competitive ... Parks Associates: Smart Home Devices: Main ... "The residential security market has experienced continued ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... 2017 , ... The Pittcon Program Committee is pleased to ... who have made outstanding contributions to analytical chemistry and applied spectroscopy. Each award ... conference and exposition for laboratory science, which will be held February 26-March 1, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: