Navigation Links
A matter of priorities
Date:4/23/2012

Just as banks store away only the most valuable possessions in the most secure safes, cells prioritise which genes they guard most closely, researchers at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory's European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) have found. The study, published online today in Nature, shows that bacteria have evolved a mechanism that protects important genes from random mutation, effectively reducing the risk of self-destruction. The findings answer a question that has been under debate for half a century and provide insights into how disease-causing mutations arise and pathogens evolve.

"We discovered that there must be a molecular mechanism that preferentially protects certain areas of the genome over others," says Nicholas Luscombe, who led the research at EMBL-EBI. "If we can identify the proteins involved and uncover how this works, we will be even closer to understanding how mutations that lead to diseases like cancer can be prevented."

Mutations are the reason each of us is unique. These changes to our genetic material are at the root of variation between individuals, and between cells within individuals. But they also have a darker side. If it affects an important gene for example, rendering a tumour-suppressing gene useless a mutation can have disastrous consequences. Nevertheless, protecting all genes from mutation would use up too many of the cell's resources, just like holding all deposits in maximum-security safes would be prohibitively expensive. Iigo Martincorena, a PhD student in Luscombe's lab, has now found that cells evolved a 'risk management' strategy to address this issue.

Looking at 120 000 tiny genetic mutations called single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 34 strains of the bacterium E. coli, the scientists were able to quantify how random the mutation rate was in different areas of the bacterial genomes. Their results showed that key genes mutate at a much lower rate than the rest of the
'/>"/>

Contact: Sonia Furtado Neves
sonia.furtado@embl.de
European Molecular Biology Laboratory
Source:Eurekalert  

Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Size matters: Large Marine Protected Areas work for dolphins
2. Ultracold matter technology from CU and SRI International licensed to Boulders ColdQuanta
3. People matter in climate change models
4. Shedding light on the dark matter of the genome
5. Location matters: For invasive aquatic species, its better to start upstream
6. The body rids itself of damage when it really matters
7. Size matters: Length of songbirds’ playlists linked to brain region proportions
8. Researchers sequence dark matter of life
9. NSF establishes Triangle (NC) Center for Soft Matter Research
10. Study finds crop performance matters when evaluating greenhouse gas emissions
11. In cell culture, like real estate, the neighborhood matters
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
A matter of priorities
(Date:7/10/2014)... Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR) and the Marshall University Joan ... will be partnering with an international biosciences company ... agreement with Shanghai-based HD Biosciences Co. Ltd., the ... of discovery and development of these new drugs. ... and commercialization rights to products developed through the ...
(Date:7/10/2014)... around a family of enzymes known as heme enzymes, ... their active site. At the centre of the heme ... (ferryl) when a reacting heme is in an intermediate ... unanswered for decades is whether this oxidation involves just ... Resolving this fundamental question has implications for understanding oxidative ...
(Date:7/10/2014)... Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite or GOES-West satellite spotted ... fires raging in Canada,s Northwestern Territories. , At ... 2014, GOES-West captured this image of the brownish-colored ... Territories that drifted all the way into South ... GOES Project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Marshall University to partner with international company in drug development venture 2Neutron crystallography solves long-standing biological mystery 2Neutron crystallography solves long-standing biological mystery 3
... Soldiers in war zones and farmers tending their fields ... their nerves. In large doses these agents, called organophosphates, ... also produce chronic disabilities such as problems with learning and ... Jr., pharmacologist at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia ...
... are human rights. Yet almost 780 million of the ... and some 2.6 billion people live without sanitary facilities. ... agricultural and manufacturing businesses already use up more than ... for water continues to rise. The Organization for Economic ...
... people to punish others who lie, cheat, steal or violate ... stand to benefit personally, is a distinctly human behavior. There ... in this "I punish you because you harmed him" fashion. ... been institutionalized in human legal systems and economists have identified ...
Cached Biology News:Effect of chronic exposure to chemicals used as weapons, pesticides under study 2Effect of chronic exposure to chemicals used as weapons, pesticides under study 3Use less water, producing energy and fertilizer at the same time 2Use less water, producing energy and fertilizer at the same time 3Crime and punishment: The neurobiological roots of modern justice 2Crime and punishment: The neurobiological roots of modern justice 3Crime and punishment: The neurobiological roots of modern justice 4Crime and punishment: The neurobiological roots of modern justice 5
(Date:7/10/2014)... , July 10, 2014 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- ... and interpretation, today announced an agreement with ... analytics for Lineagen,s NextStep Dx PLUS.  ... neurodevelopmental and neurological disorders, currently offers FirstStep ... (CMA) testing service used by healthcare providers ...
(Date:7/10/2014)... in the fight against terrorism with the creation of ... with the use of light and special glass fibres. ... B: Chemical , the researchers describe a novel optical ... low as 6.3 ppm (parts per million). It requires ... "Traditionally explosives detection has involved looking for metals that ...
(Date:7/10/2014)... the fractional quantum Hall effect in bilayer graphene and ... tuned by an electric field. , The fractional ... to thin sheets are exposed to large magnetic fields, ... of individual electrons behave as a single system. However, ... established, many details of this collective behavior remain not ...
(Date:7/10/2014)... study by researchers at the University of Illinois ... mechanisms governing the interplay of spin and heat ... of ultrafast spintronic devices for data storage and ... as well as spin-angular momentum. In a typical ... is no spin current," explained David Cahill, a ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Tute Genomics Platform Selected to Provide Clinical Interpretation for Lineagen's NextStepDx PLUS Next-Generation Sequencing-Based Diagnostic Test 2Tute Genomics Platform Selected to Provide Clinical Interpretation for Lineagen's NextStepDx PLUS Next-Generation Sequencing-Based Diagnostic Test 3Tute Genomics Platform Selected to Provide Clinical Interpretation for Lineagen's NextStepDx PLUS Next-Generation Sequencing-Based Diagnostic Test 4Detecting trace amounts of explosives with light 2Columbia researchers observe tunable quantum behavior in bilayer graphene 2Columbia researchers observe tunable quantum behavior in bilayer graphene 3University of Illinois study advances limits for ultrafast nano-devices 2
... The Center for Advanced Technology and Innovation , ... breath commercial life into unused and underused technologies, is ... , ,If successful at facilitating the launch of new ... development in Wisconsin and elsewhere while building connections for ...
... - State Senator Ted Kanavas , R-Brookfield, ... defying a federal law to suspend taxation on Internet access, ... the state is in compliance with the law. , ... the Internet Nondiscrimination Act of 2004. According to Kanavas, the ...
... - When it comes to reporting lost mobile data ... ,By now, most technologically savvy people have heard the ... reported lost or stolen from entities like the ... the data encryption software developer, more than 85,000 cell ...
Cached Biology Technology:CATI takes tech transfer model national 2CATI takes tech transfer model national 3Kanavas rips Doyle for taxing Internet 2Security concerns grow with mobile tech devices 2Security concerns grow with mobile tech devices 3Security concerns grow with mobile tech devices 4Security concerns grow with mobile tech devices 5
We offer solid and solution phase peptide synthesis including a whole range of modifications. Please send the details of your peptide synthesis need to info@rpeptide.com...
Maxi 14 Hybridization Oven. 14 bottle (35 mm) rotisserie + shaker tray available for simultaneous use. Includes linear and orbital shaker trays, 4 medium bottles, pack of mesh, bottle gripper and d...
Request Info...
Request Info...
Biology Products: