Navigation Links
A gene family that suppresses prostate cancer
Date:3/13/2014

ITHACA, N.Y. Cornell University researchers report they have discovered direct genetic evidence that a family of genes, called MicroRNA-34 (miR-34), are bona fide tumor suppressors.

The study is published in the journal Cell Reports, March 13.

Previous research at Cornell and elsewhere has shown that another gene, called p53, acts to positively regulate miR-34. Mutations of p53 have been implicated in half of all cancers. Interestingly, miR-34 is also frequently silenced by mechanisms other than p53 in many cancers, including those with p53 mutations.

The researchers showed in mice how interplay between genes p53 and miR-34 jointly inhibits another cancer-causing gene called MET. In absence of p53 and miR-34, MET overexpresses a receptor protein and promotes unregulated cell growth and metastasis.

This is the first time this mechanism has been proven in a mouse model, said Alexander Nikitin, a professor of pathology in Cornell's Department of Biomedical Sciences and the paper's senior author. Chieh-Yang Cheng, a graduate student in Nikitin's lab, is the paper's first author.

In a 2011 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences paper, Nikitin and colleagues showed that p53 and miR-34 jointly regulate MET in cell culture but it remained unknown if the same mechanism works in a mouse model of cancer (a special strain of mice used to study human disease).

The findings suggest that drug therapies that target and suppress MET could be especially successful in cancers where both p53 and miR-34 are deficient.

The researchers used mice bred to develop prostate cancer, then inactivated the p53 gene by itself, or miR-34 by itself, or both together, but only in epithelium tissue of the prostate, as global silencing of these genes may have produced misleading results.

When miR-34 genes alone were silenced in the mice, the mice developed cancer free. When p53 was silenced by itself, there were signs of precancerous lesions early in development, but no cancer by 15 months of age. When miR-34 and p53 genes were both silenced together, the researchers observed full prostate cancer in the mice.

The findings revealed that "miR-34 can be a tumor-suppressor gene, but it has to work together with p53," Nikitin said.

In mice that had both miR-34 and p53 silenced concurrently, cancerous lesions formed in a proximal part of the prostrate ducts, in a compartment known to contain prostate stem cells. The early lesions that developed when p53 was silenced alone occurred in a distal part of the ducts, away from the compartment where the stem cell pool is located. This suggested there was another mechanism involved when p53 and miR-34 were jointly silenced.

Also, the number of stem cells in mice with both p53 and miR-34 silenced increased substantially compared with control mice or mice with only miR-34 or p53 independently silenced.

"These results indicated that together miR-34 and p53 regulate the prostate stem cell compartments," said Nikitin.

This is significant, as cancer frequently develops when stem cells become unregulated and grow uncontrollably, he said.

Researchers further found that p53 and miR-34 affect stem cell growth by regulating MET expression. In absence of p53 and miR-34, MET is overexpressed, which leads to uncontrolled growth of prostate stem cells and high levels of cancer in these mice.

Future work will further examine the role of p53/miR-34/MET genes in stem cell growth and cancer. The findings have implications for many types of cancer.


'/>"/>

Contact: Joe Schwartz
Joe.Schwartz@cornell.edu
607-254-6235
Cornell University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Sequencing hundreds of nuclear genes in the sunflower family now possible
2. Price Family Foundation funds research collaboration between Albert Einstein College of Medicine and University of Oklahoma
3. Price Family Foundation gift will create groundbreaking structural biology institute
4. Study of rodent family tree puts brakes on commonly held understanding of evolution
5. Crown of Venezuelan paramos: A new species from the daisy family, Coespeletia palustris
6. Population Council to present more than 40 studies at International Conference on Family Planning
7. Family Resiliency Center helps study how food-bank clients afford basic non-food items
8. Family matters: Evolutionary relationships among species of magic mushrooms shed light on fungi
9. Family tree of fish yields surprises
10. PatientStream announces the industrys first Multilingual family waiting room board
11. Family studies suggest rare genetic mutations team up to cause schizophrenia
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/11/2016)... CHICAGO , Jan. 11, 2016  higi, ... via nearly 10,000 retail locations, web and mobile, ... than $40 million from existing investors. ... will be devoted to further innovate higi,s health ... app and web portal – including expanding services ...
(Date:1/7/2016)... , Jan. 7, 2016 This BCC Research ... for biometric technologies and devices, identifying newer markets and ... various types of biometric devices. Includes forecast from 2015 ... Identify newer markets and explore the expansion of the ... Examine each type of biometric technology, determine its current ...
(Date:1/6/2016)... 2016  Varam Capital, a provider of micro-finance inclusion ... deliver advanced authentication solutions to their clients. Varam supplies ... A loan of a few thousand rupees may make ... ability to purchase livestock or equipment for a small ... for a local store. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/4/2016)... ... February 04, 2016 , ... Franz Inc. ... Graph Database technology has been recognized As “ Best in Semantic Web Technology ... , “At Corporate America, it’s our priority to showcase prominent professionals who are ...
(Date:2/3/2016)... LONDON , Feb. 3, 2016  With ... current patent cliff that is underway, therapies such ... vaccines for a whole host of indications are ... to aid in the development and production of ... yields, poor quality and high costs, novel approaches ...
(Date:2/3/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 03, 2016 , ... ... validating a series of potential targets (epitopes) specific to misfolded, propagating strains of ... to create specific monoclonal antibody therapeutics for Alzheimer’s. , Following on from the ...
(Date:2/3/2016)... Buffalo, NY (PRWEB) , ... February 03, 2016 ... ... several new products to aid in the rapid development and ongoing quality control ... the Zika Virus outbreak is extremely high,” Dr. Gregory R. Chiklis, President and ...
Breaking Biology Technology: