Navigation Links
A change of heart
Date:2/23/2012

San Diego, Calif. Beyond the personal tragedy of chronic alcoholism there is heartbreak in the biological sense, too. Scientists know severe alcoholism stresses the heart and that mitochondria, the cellular energy factories, are especially vulnerable to dysfunction. But they don't know the precise mechanism.

Now new experiments led by a team at the Wadsworth Center of the New York State Department of Health in Albany, and Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, may provide insights into possible modes of heart damage from alcohol. The teams will present their findings at the 56th Annual Meeting of the Biophysical Society (BPS), held Feb. 25-29 in San Diego, Calif.

Using a technique called electron microscopic tomography, the Albany group produced the first 3D images of mitochondria and discovered tiny tethers linking mitochondria to another cell compartment, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where calcium is stored. A clue about the role of these tethers was provided by collaborative experiments with the Philadelphia group. Normally mitochondria take up very little calcium but, as mitochondria get closer to the ER, calcium uptake increases. Calcium overload damages mitochondria, shutting down energy production and leading to cell death.

The researchers looked at calcium regulation and cell structure in the pumping chambers of two groups of laboratory rats to find clues to how hearts are damaged by alcohol consumption. One group of rats was healthy and one was fed alcohol for six months.

The 3D images the team produced clearly show that the mitochondria of alcohol-fed rats are disorganized. The primary focus of the team's ongoing analysis is the mitochondrial interface with the ER in particular, characterization of the length, number, and distribution of tethers, which could explain the observed dysfunction of heart mitochondria.

"We're hoping our ongoing 3D analysis, coupled with the functional information provided by our colleagues at Thomas Jefferson, will help answer the question of how alcohol causes heart disease," says biophysicist and lead Albany researcher Carmen Mannella, Ph.D. "If we can understand how chronic alcoholism disrupts fundamental functions such as calcium signaling, then hopefully that information can be used to design preventive or corrective therapies to save hearts and lives of those suffering from the disease of alcoholism."

The presentation, "SR-Mitochondrial ultrastructure in the heart of normal and ethanol-fed rats," is at 4:45 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2012, in the San Diego Convention Center, Room 31ABC. ABSTRACT: http://tinyurl.com/7s4gkls


'/>"/>

Contact: Ellen R. Weiss
eweiss@biophysics.org
240-290-5606
American Institute of Physics
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Peat fires could accelerate climate change
2. As climate change increases forest fires, smoke forecasting could help protect public health
3. ChromaDex® Announces Management Changes
4. AAAS-SFU research: Chilling climate-change related news
5. AAAS-SFU research: Linking human evolution and climate change
6. Marine protected areas: changing climate could require change of plans
7. 4 new drugs will change prostate cancer care
8. Climate change threatens tropical birds
9. Time of year important in projections of climate change effects on ecosystems
10. Fish of Antarctica threatened by climate change
11. Detecting detrimental change in coral reefs
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/10/2016)... , March 10, 2016   Unisys Corporation ... and Border Protection (CBP) is testing its biometric identity ... San Diego to help identify certain non-U.S. citizens ... . The test, designed to help determine the efficiency and ... began in February and will run until May 2016. ...
(Date:3/9/2016)... 9, 2016  Crossmatch ® , a leading ... today announced the addition of smart features to ... multi-factor authentication platform. New contextual and application-specific authentication ... security where it,s needed most — while minimizing ... . --> Washington, DC ...
(Date:3/3/2016)... MONTEREY, Calif. , March 3, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... Partner, launched this week highlighting advancements in flexible, ... – a record setting attendance - have gathered ... in this fast-growing field of electronics. The Flex ... a focal point for companies, R&D organizations, and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... 27, 2016 , ... Shimadzu Scientific Instruments (SSI) will be ... Business Conference and Expo. Shimadzu’s high-performance instruments enable laboratories to test cannabis products ... can stop by booth 1021 to learn how Shimadzu’s instruments can help improve ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... April 27, 2016 , ... The Board of Directors ... of John Tilton as Chief Commercial Officer.  Mr. Tilton joined Biohaven from Alexion ... commercial leaders responsible for the commercialization of multiple orphan drug indications. Mr. ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Global Stem Cells Group and the University of ... research and development initiatives for potential stem cell protocol management for 2016 – 2020. ... executives began meeting to establish a working agenda and foster initiatives to promote stem ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... ... ... The European Patent Office (EPO) today announced that U.S. ... European Inventor Award 2016 in the category "Non-European countries." The winners of the 11th ... Lisbon on June 9th. , The human capacity to walk with fluidity is the ...
Breaking Biology Technology: