Navigation Links
2 players produce destructive cascade of diabetic retinopathy

Augusta, Ga. - The retina can be bombarded by reactive oxygen species in diabetes, prompting events that destroy healthy blood vessels, form leaky new ones and ruin vision.

Now researchers have learned that those chemically reactive molecules must come from both the bone marrow as well as the retinal cells themselves to cause such serious consequences.

"It's a cascade that requires two players to signal the next event that causes the damage," said Dr. Ruth Caldwell, cell biologist at the Vascular Biology Center at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University.

The good news is the finding also provides two new points for intervention, said Dr. Modesto Rojas, MCG postdoctoral fellow and first author of the study in the journal PLOS ONE.

Excessive glucose in the blood prompts excessive production of reactive oxygen species, or ROS, and the light-sensitive retina is particularly vulnerable. Caldwell's research team had previously documented that ROS from white blood cells produced by the bone marrow as well as from retinal cells were the major instigators in diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of blindness worldwide. But they weren't sure which mattered most.

So they looked as several different scenarios, including mice lacking the ability to produce ROS by either the retinal or white blood cells, and found that if either were lacking, future damage was essentially eliminated. "One alone can't do it," said Caldwell, the study's corresponding author. "They did not develop the early signs of diabetic retinopathy that we were measuring."

While blocking ROS production by retinal cells could be difficult, drugs already exist that reduce activation of white blood cells. Those cells not only make ROS, but also adhere to blood vessel walls in the retina that become sticky in diabetes, Rojas said. In fact, a study published in October 2013 in PLOS ONE showed that neutrophil inhibitory factor could block the vascular lesions that are a hallmark of diabetic retinopathy without hurting the immunity of diabetic mice. The MCG scientists note that decreased activation does not impact the immune protection white blood cells also provide.

Next steps include studying those drugs in their animal models and learning more about how ROS causes the collateral damage that can destroy vision. "All of this is some sort of wound-healing response gone wrong," Caldwell said.

ROS, a natural byproduct of the body's use of oxygen, has healthy roles in the body, including cell signaling, but is destructive at high levels that result from disease states such as diabetes.

Contact: Toni Baker
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Related biology news :

1. Measuring the exertion of mini-basketball players
2. Study discovers natural hybridization produced dolphin species
3. Gene therapy for human skin disease produces long-term benefits
4. How living cells solved a needle in a haystack problem to produce electrical signals
5. Hypersensitivity to pain produced by early life stress is worsened by later stress exposure
6. Breakthrough research produces brighter, more efficiently produced lighting
7. Small changes in ag practices could reduce produce-borne illness
8. TabletKiosk and SMI Collaborate to Produce the Sahara EyeSlate
9. Over-produced autism gene alters synapses, affects learning and behavior in mice
10. Bacteria use hydrogen, carbon dioxide to produce electricity
11. Neiker-Tecnalia and FARMARABA produce Omega 3 using marine plant micro-organisms
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
2 players produce destructive cascade of diabetic retinopathy
(Date:10/6/2015)... 2015  Maverix Biomics, Inc., a leading genomic ... software portfolio with the debut of its RNA-Seq ... in eukaryotes. The software is integrated into the ... analysis solution that leverages proven open-source algorithms and ... efforts. Garry Nolan,s laboratory at ...
(Date:9/30/2015)... , Sept. 30, 2015  The U.S. Court of ... another key ruling in favor of Crossmatch ™, ... fingerprint scanner company Suprema and its U.S. partner Mentalix ... a trade provision that declares it unlawful to engage ... infringing two of Crossmatch,s patents, the 5,900,993 patent and ...
(Date:9/28/2015)...  The monitoring of vital signs, such as ... an essential component of patient assessment. Changes in ... a patient,s condition. However, in general care areas ... during routine observation rounds only once every four ... these observation rounds, the warning signs can go ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/13/2015)... , October 13, 2015 " ... and Forecast 2015 - 2023 " , the ... and is anticipated to reach US$7.59 bn by 2023, expanding at ... 2023. --> " Microbiology Culture Market - Global ... " , the global microbiology culture market was ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... --      Q BioMed Inc (OTC: QBIO), ... a strategic relationship with Wombat Capital, Ltd., a ... France based strategic and scientific advisory firm.. ... collaborative arrangement gives Q BioMed and its stakeholders access ... as long established pharmaceutical industry relationships. The advisors within ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2015 , ... ... and distributor of automation systems, material handling solutions and components, is opening its ... I-94 near State Street, the facility is Exotic’s second major expansion in Metropolitan ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... , ... October 13, 2015 , ... ... educational opportunities for school age children in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering ... sectors of the national economy, and the program aims to increase the number ...
Breaking Biology Technology: