Navigation Links
2 players produce destructive cascade of diabetic retinopathy
Date:1/13/2014

Augusta, Ga. - The retina can be bombarded by reactive oxygen species in diabetes, prompting events that destroy healthy blood vessels, form leaky new ones and ruin vision.

Now researchers have learned that those chemically reactive molecules must come from both the bone marrow as well as the retinal cells themselves to cause such serious consequences.

"It's a cascade that requires two players to signal the next event that causes the damage," said Dr. Ruth Caldwell, cell biologist at the Vascular Biology Center at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University.

The good news is the finding also provides two new points for intervention, said Dr. Modesto Rojas, MCG postdoctoral fellow and first author of the study in the journal PLOS ONE.

Excessive glucose in the blood prompts excessive production of reactive oxygen species, or ROS, and the light-sensitive retina is particularly vulnerable. Caldwell's research team had previously documented that ROS from white blood cells produced by the bone marrow as well as from retinal cells were the major instigators in diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of blindness worldwide. But they weren't sure which mattered most.

So they looked as several different scenarios, including mice lacking the ability to produce ROS by either the retinal or white blood cells, and found that if either were lacking, future damage was essentially eliminated. "One alone can't do it," said Caldwell, the study's corresponding author. "They did not develop the early signs of diabetic retinopathy that we were measuring."

While blocking ROS production by retinal cells could be difficult, drugs already exist that reduce activation of white blood cells. Those cells not only make ROS, but also adhere to blood vessel walls in the retina that become sticky in diabetes, Rojas said. In fact, a study published in October 2013 in PLOS ONE showed that neutrophil inhibitory factor could block the vascular lesions that are a hallmark of diabetic retinopathy without hurting the immunity of diabetic mice. The MCG scientists note that decreased activation does not impact the immune protection white blood cells also provide.

Next steps include studying those drugs in their animal models and learning more about how ROS causes the collateral damage that can destroy vision. "All of this is some sort of wound-healing response gone wrong," Caldwell said.

ROS, a natural byproduct of the body's use of oxygen, has healthy roles in the body, including cell signaling, but is destructive at high levels that result from disease states such as diabetes.
'/>"/>

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Measuring the exertion of mini-basketball players
2. Study discovers natural hybridization produced dolphin species
3. Gene therapy for human skin disease produces long-term benefits
4. How living cells solved a needle in a haystack problem to produce electrical signals
5. Hypersensitivity to pain produced by early life stress is worsened by later stress exposure
6. Breakthrough research produces brighter, more efficiently produced lighting
7. Small changes in ag practices could reduce produce-borne illness
8. TabletKiosk and SMI Collaborate to Produce the Sahara EyeSlate
9. Over-produced autism gene alters synapses, affects learning and behavior in mice
10. Bacteria use hydrogen, carbon dioxide to produce electricity
11. Neiker-Tecnalia and FARMARABA produce Omega 3 using marine plant micro-organisms
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
2 players produce destructive cascade of diabetic retinopathy
(Date:12/16/2016)...   IdentyTechSolutions America LLC , a leading ... and a cutting-edge manufacturer of software and hardware ... seamless, integrated solutions that comprise IDT biometric readers ... provide IdentyTech,s customers with combined physical identification and ... and theft. "We are proud to ...
(Date:12/15/2016)... 2016   WaferGen Bio-systems, Inc. (NASDAQ: ... announced today that on December 13, 2016, it received ... Nasdaq Stock Market LLC which acknowledged that, as of ... common stock had been at $1.00 or greater for ... with Listing Rule 5550(a)(2) of the Nasdaq Stock Market. ...
(Date:12/15/2016)... Dec. 14, 2016 "Increase in mobile transactions ... The mobile biometrics market is expected to grow from ... by 2022, at a CAGR of 29.3% between 2016 ... as the growing demand for smart devices, government initiatives, ... "Software component is expected to grow at a ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/11/2017)... Colo. (PRWEB) , ... January 11, 2017 , ... ... the journal Clinical Cancer Research show early promise of the investigational anti-cancer agent ... despite a median 5 previous treatment regimens. Twenty-seven percent of these heavily pretreated ...
(Date:1/11/2017)... 2017  Brian Mehling, M.D., world-renowned stem cell researcher, ... International (BHI), will be attending the 47th Annual World ... from January 17-20, 2017. This will be Dr. Mehling,s ... theme of this year,s forum is Responsive and Responsible ... address strategies for fostering greater social inclusion and human ...
(Date:1/11/2017)... ... 2017 , ... IsoPlexis Corporation (IsoPlexis), a venture-capital ... the proteomic function of individual cells in patients, today announced it was recently ... National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health to develop a ...
(Date:1/11/2017)... ... January 11, 2017 , ... Advanced Polymer ... its team. Bernhard Bartylla will lead European initiatives for APMT’s product lines serving ... ACOMP and ARGEN to European manufacturers and researchers. Bernhard brings significant experience in ...
Breaking Biology Technology: