Navigation Links
1 step closer to a drug treatment for cystic fibrosis, MU professor says
Date:10/12/2010

COLUMBIA, Mo. A University of Missouri researcher believes his latest work moves scientists closer to a cure for cystic fibrosis, one of the world's most common fatal genetic diseases.

The Journal of Biological Chemistry has published findings by Tzyh-Chang Hwang, a professor in the School of Medicine's Department of Medical Pharmacology and Physiology and the Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center. The publication has been recognized as the "paper of the week" for the journal, meaning Hwang's work is considered to be in the top 1 percent of papers reviewed annually in terms of significance and overall importance.

Hwang's work focuses on the two most common genetic mutations among approximately 1,500 mutations found in patients with cystic fibrosis. These two mutations cause specific chloride channels in the cell, known as the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) chloride channels, to malfunction. This ultimately leads to repeated pneumonia, the primary cause of most deaths associated with cystic fibrosis.

"The normal function of a cell is to pass chloride ions across the cell membrane at a very fast speed," Hwang said. "We know some signaling molecules elicit this reaction, much like a hand signals an automatic water faucet to dispense water. But in the case of cystic fibrosis, that signal is no longer detected by the mutated channel protein. Through some mechanisms we still don't quite understand, malfunction of this channel protein eventually leads to bacterial infection in the lung, which is believed to be responsible for the most severe symptoms of cystic fibrosis."

The most recent study found that manipulating the sensor of the channel protein can significantly rectify the malfunction of the mutated channel, thus opening the door to a drug design that may eventually be a "real cure," Hwang said.

"We could help a lot of patients if we can utilize the power of computer simulations and structure-based drug design to discover new therapeutical reagents for cystic fibrosis, but it's very expensive to do this kind of research in an academic institute," Hwang said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Steven Adams
AdamsST@missouri.edu
573-882-8353
University of Missouri-Columbia
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Plant scientists move closer to making any crop drought-tolerant
2. Solid oxide fuel cells getting closer to the market
3. Gene therapy a step closer to mass production
4. Research is getting closer to understanding critical nucleus in haze formation, prof says
5. Genome BC, Chile and Norway take another step closer to fully sequencing the salmon genome
6. Low-cost, ultra-fast DNA sequencing brings diagnostic use closer
7. For osteoporosis patients, exercise pill one step closer to reality
8. Bringing better grapes a step closer to reality
9. Cold fusion moves closer to mainstream acceptance
10. 1 step closer to closure
11. ESA and World Bank move toward closer collaboration
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:11/29/2016)... -- BioDirection, a privately held medical device company developing ... of concussion and other traumatic brain injury (TBI), announced ... with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ... the meeting company representatives reviewed plans for clinical development ... of a planned pilot trial. "We ...
(Date:11/24/2016)... Cercacor today introduced Ember TM Sport ... non-invasively measure hemoglobin, Oxygen Content, Oxygen Saturation, Perfusion ... in approximately 30 seconds. Smaller than a smartphone, using ... to key data about their bodies to help monitor ... Hemoglobin carries oxygen to muscles. When hemoglobin ...
(Date:11/19/2016)... 2016 Securus Technologies, a leading provider of ... investigation, corrections and monitoring, announced today that it has ... have an independent technology judge determine who has the ... tech/sophisticated telephone calling platform, and the best customer service. ... most of what we do – which clearly is ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... December 01, 2016 , ... ... DNA microarray comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) for HER2 genomic subtyping in ... molecular test results from tumors with previously documented positive, negative, and equivocal ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... 01, 2016 , ... The Conference Forum has announced that the 3rd annual ... place on February 1-3, 2017 at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York City. Led ... a unique 360-degree approach, which addresses the most up-to-date information regarding business aspects, clinical ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... December 02, 2016 , ... ... dedicated to collaboratively developing improved chemistry, manufacturing and control technologies for the ... UHPLC, with robust, probe-based sampling. , Online liquid chromatography analysis is ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... , December 2, 2016 The ... 2021, growing at a CAGR of 7.3% during the forecast period ... hospitals and diagnostic laboratories segment accounted for the largest share of ... ... report on global immunohistochemistry (IHC) market spread across 225 pages, profiling ...
Breaking Biology Technology: