Navigation Links
1/3 of risk for dementia attributable to small vessel disease, autopsy study shows
Date:4/6/2008

Alzheimer's disease may be what most people fear as they grow older, but autopsy data from a long-range study of 3,400 men and women in the Seattle region found that the brains of a third of those who had become demented before death showed evidence of small vessel damage: the type of small, cumulative injury that can come from hypertension or diabetes.

Dr. Thomas Montine, University of Washington, presented the study results at Experimental Biology 2008 in San Diego on April 6. His presentation was part of the scientific program of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB).

In the autopsied brains of people who had experienced cognitive decline and dementia, 45 percent of the risk for dementia was associated with pathologic changes of Alzheimer's disease. Another 10 percent of dementia risk was associated with Lewy bodies, neocortical structural changes that indicate a degenerative brain disease known as Lewy Body Dementia, believed by some clinicians to be a variant of Alzheimer's and/or Parkinson's disease. But a third of the risk for dementia (33 percent) was associated with damage to the brain from small vessel disease.

Dr. Montine and his colleagues believe that, and are now studying in more detail, this small vessel damage is the cumulative effect of multiple small strokes caused by hypertension and diabetes, strokes so small that the person experiences no sensation or problems until the cumulative effect reaches a tipping point. This may be good news, says Dr. Montine. At a time when prevention and treatment for Alzheimer's remain investigational, methods for preventing complications of hypertension and diabetes are currently available.

These findings are very different from both conventional wisdom and from those of most autopsy studies of brain aging and dementia, says Dr. Montine.

Why such different results? Perhaps because of the broad reach of the population on which the autopsy study was based, says Dr. Montine. Most studies looking at the structural changes on autopsy in brains of persons with dementia have focused on participants in Alzheimer's disease center studies or in populations limited to one gender, ethnic or professional group. Individuals in this study were part of the Group Health Cooperative, one of the oldest and largest managed care programs in the United States.

Members in the group who reach 65 with normal cognitive ability are eligible to volunteer for an Adult Changes in Thought (ACT) study, established by Dr. Eric Larson, director of Research at the Group Health Cooperative. ACT participants undergo cognitive, neurological and psychological tests every two years until their death.

Between 1994 and 2006, the period covered by this study, 3,400 men and women entered the ACT study. They were representative of the Seattle urban and suburban area: white, Asian, African American and Hispanic, with a range of educational and professional levels. During this 12-year period, some participants suffered cognitive impairment and dementia, while others did not. Roughly a third of all participants died, and autopsies were performed on the 221 who had given permission for this to be done.

With 55 percent of the risk for dementia attributable to Alzheimer's and Lewy Body Dementia, these findings underscore the therapeutic imperative for developing new pharmacologic and other means of preventing or delaying the onset of Alzheimer's and Lewy Body disease, says Dr. Montine. But the unexpected finding that a third of the risk for dementia is related to small vessel disease also provides an additional reason to control hypertension and diabetes: not only to protect cardiovascular and renal health but also to protect the health of the brain.


'/>"/>

Contact: Sylvia Wrobel
ebpress@gmail.com
770-722-1055
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Social parasites of the smaller kind
2. Small animal imaging facility is big boon to research
3. Handbook of small grain insects available now
4. New molecular clock from LLNL and CDC indicates smallpox evolved earlier than believed
5. 2007 ozone hole smaller than usual
6. Cilia: small organelles, big decisions
7. Research shows loggerhead sea turtles threatened by small-scale fishing operations
8. Small-scale fishing in Mexico rivals industrial fisheries in accidental turtle deaths
9. Sweet potato shines as new promise for small enterprise and hunger relief in developing countries
10. Identification of a novel class of (not-so) small RNAs
11. Small RNA plays parallel roles in bacterial metabolism
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/29/2016)... RATON, Florida , March 29, 2016 ... or the "Company") LegacyXChange "LEGX" and SelectaDNA/CSI Protect are ... DNA in ink used in a variety of writing ... theft. Buyers of originally created collectibles from athletes on ... through forensic analysis of the DNA. ...
(Date:3/22/2016)... India , March 22, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... market research report "Electronic Sensors Market for Consumer ... Proximity, & Others), Application (Communication & IT, ... Geography - Global Forecast to 2022", published ... industry is expected to reach USD 26.76 ...
(Date:3/21/2016)... , March 22, 2016 ... recognition with passcodes for superior security   ... a leading provider of secure digital communications services, today ... biometric technology and offer enterprise customers, particularly those in ... facial recognition and voice authentication within a mobile app, ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Researchers at the Universita Politecnica ... in people with peritoneal or pleural mesothelioma. Their findings are the subject of a ... , Diagnostic biomarkers are signposts in the blood, lung fluid or tissue of ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Mass. , June 23, 2016   ... development of novel compounds designed to target cancer ... napabucasin, has been granted Orphan Drug Designation from ... the treatment of gastric cancer, including gastroesophageal junction ... stemness inhibitor designed to inhibit cancer stemness pathways ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 Houston Methodist ... the Cy-Fair Sports Association to serve as their ... agreement, Houston Methodist Willowbrook will provide sponsorship support, ... connectivity with association coaches, volunteers, athletes and families. ... the Cy-Fair Sports Association and to bring Houston ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June, 23, 2016  The Biodesign Challenge ... envision new ways to harness living systems and biotechnology, ... Art (MoMA) in New York City ... 130 participating students, showcased projects at MoMA,s Celeste Bartos ... Paola Antonelli , MoMA,s senior curator of architecture and ...
Breaking Biology Technology: